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  • why pharmacy why not medicine

    what do people think is the best answer for the above question. I would probs just say i doubt i can get the grades for medicine but wudnt that sound silly
    3rd yr pharmacy student - bath

  • #2
    Part of the answer is intellectual: how drugs are made, how they work in the body and how they affect other drugs, and the other part of the answer is personal: you get far more involved with people as a doctor than you do as a pharmacist, and that was one of the reasons I didn't and don't want to study medicine. Look at some of the stuff Dr Crippen has to deal with: http://nhsblogdoc.blogspot.com/ I simply couldn't cope emotionally with some of the stuff he has to deal with. You can still build great relationships with your patients as a pharmacist, they just don't tend to go as deep as that of a doctor-patient relationship.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Steve G View Post
      You can still build great relationships with your patients as a pharmacist, they just don't tend to go as deep as that of a doctor-patient relationship.
      I tend to agree, but every now and then someone bucks the trend - moreso in recent years, maybe it's because I'm older, maybe because it's more difficult to see your own doctor, who knows.

      Jeff

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      • #4
        As well as the emotional aspect, I wanted to avoid the messy aspect of injecting, blood etc. The diabetes testing thing being carried out by some community pharmacists scares me!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jeff View Post
          I tend to agree, but every now and then someone bucks the trend - moreso in recent years, maybe it's because I'm older, maybe because it's more difficult to see your own doctor, who knows.

          Jeff
          Funny, that;
          Following the introduction of MURs, a large Multiple conducted a survey of patient who'd recently had one at their pharmacy; a common mention in their feedback was that the pharmacists were now doing what the GPs used to have time to do 20 years ago, i.e. sit down and have a chat about all their medication...!
          Ze genuine Article, present & perfect!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by hannahd View Post
            As well as the emotional aspect, I wanted to avoid the messy aspect of injecting, blood etc. The diabetes testing thing being carried out by some community pharmacists scares me!
            Hannahd,
            the drop of blood we need to check for sugars is the TINIEST drop you've ever seen, you probably loose more blood than that every day when brushing your teeth if your gums bleed; you don't even get to see the needle used to draw the blood, it's all inside the sterile, single-use lancet!
            There is absolutely nothing scary or messy about it, I promise!
            Ze genuine Article, present & perfect!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zoggite View Post
              Hannahd,
              the drop of blood we need to check for sugars is the TINIEST drop you've ever seen, you probably loose more blood than that every day when brushing your teeth if your gums bleed; you don't even get to see the needle used to draw the blood, it's all inside the sterile, single-use lancet!
              There is absolutely nothing scary or messy about it, I promise!
              It's the actual pricking business that makes me wince. I couldn't do it to myself never mind anyone else!

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              • #8
                It's the actual pricking business that makes me wince. I couldn't do it to myself never mind anyone else!
                Totally agree with you! Also the site of blood coming out of someone makes me faint. No matter how little it is!

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                • #9
                  Blood

                  Oh come on! You faint if you prick your finger? Never fell over and scraped your knees as a kid?

                  You use a lancet finger pricking device to get one drop of blood out of the finger. If you do it correct it doesn't even hurt.

                  I guess you'll never work in hospital or industry by choice, but what are you going to do when people come to you for help? I've bandaged up loads of cut heads, fingers, kids knees etc and given CPR. How will you manage any of these things?

                  My friend had a woman who had a vein actually burst whilst in the shop, and had to apply pressure to it to keep her going.

                  I've been lucky enough to stand next to the surgeon in the theatre whilst he did a bypass and a valve replacement. When he started he asked "where's the student?" to which I said "I'm here" whilst being stood next to the guys feet! He quickly replied "well it's no use standing there girl, I'm opening up the chest so come on over here". If I fainted/screamed/left/puked think how silly and unprofessional I would have looked!

                  If I had a pound for every drop of blood I've seen or cut whatever - I'd be rich.

                  The good thing is you very quickly become used to this kind of thing, so just keep going and you'll be fine.
                  Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
                  Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
                  Thank you for contributing to this site.

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                  • #10
                    Its funny when it happens to me im okay but if i see someone else i just start feeling dizzy.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by confused.com View Post
                      Its funny when it happens to me im okay but if i see someone else i just start feeling dizzy.
                      Well maybe your parasympathetic nervous system over compensates for the adrenaline produced as a stress reaction to what you are seeing, and thus makes you feel dizzy. I just made that up so don't ask me to justify it please!

                      You can honestly very quickly get used to the sight of blood, guts, insides of people, wounds etc. Just start with something simple, like witnessing somebody else doing a procedure, and your tolerance very quickly increases.

                      When I went into that theatre to watch the bypass etc I think I was more nervous then the guy having it done. After about only five minutes I was fascinated, and chatting away to the surgeons about the next step. The only bit I really hated was when they used the cortarising knife and the smoke kept going up my nose. Every way I turned my head it seemed to follow me, and stunk like burning pork!
                      Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
                      Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
                      Thank you for contributing to this site.

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                      • #12
                        You do tell the best stories admin... I continue to be fascinated by your life. How did you get lucky enough to witness such a procedure?! I would give an arm! I love that stuff.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BeesKnees View Post
                          You do tell the best stories admin... I continue to be fascinated by your life. How did you get lucky enough to witness such a procedure?! I would give an arm! I love that stuff.
                          Well it was easy really. After my 2nd year I had to do at least two weels experience in a hospital as part of my course. I managed to get a job there for the whole summer, and asked if it was possible to see any theatre procedures - I really was expecting endoscopy or something like that.

                          One of the clinical pharmacists told me surgeons love to show off their work, so he just asked a surgeon he knew if one of the pharmacy students could come along for experience. Before I knew it, I was talking to the anaestheist about the drugs they use in the theatre, all dressed up in theatre gowns ready to go in. I saw a bypass in the morning and a valve replacement in the afternoon.

                          The bit that scared me was she (the anaestheist) told me if I felt faint I should leave the theatre, as you tend to fall forward if you actually do faint, and my face could end up on this guys heart!

                          Some things I didn't realise that go on: -

                          1. As soon as your eyes shut that gown comes off and you are laid there starkers with about a dozen or so people walking past you.

                          2. A Dr inserts a catheter as the same people walk past you

                          3. People are walking in and out of the theatre all the time, as long as they stay in a "clean area"

                          4. The consultants strut around like gods, and swear a lot. One shouted at this young surgeon, and then asked him to attach one of the graphs on the bypass patient. He was so nervous his hands were shaking - a LOT

                          5. When they cut the aorta to attach it to the bypass machine, it's like turning on two taps in the chest - except its blood, not water. They suck it all up really quickly and it goes back into the bypass machine

                          6. Its no wonder you die in seconds if you get shot/stabbed in the heart

                          7. Old people have thin aortas. When they turned the bypass machine off on the guy who had the valve replacement (in his 80's) blood squirted everywhere like it was a punctured tyre. The consultant said "see, thin aorta due to his age"

                          8. The bypass guys heart was covered in yellow fat. I asked the surgeon if everyone's heart was like that. He replied "all the hearts I see are" - let that be a warning to all you people who eat more then 12 mince pies in one sitting!

                          9. Look after your heart !

                          10. It's no wonder it hurts when you wake up !

                          If you ever get the chance go! It's amazing how many people I have met who were having a bypass and didn't really understand what it was. My experience meant I could give them an accurate (not too accurate!) picture of what goes on. I also felt after that I could cope with anything, that was until I smelled my first anaerobic infected leg ulcer.

                          The worst thing I have ever seen was an old lady with a fungating breast cancer, that went right up to her neck. She had had breast cancer previously, and when it came back she was too afraid to tell anyone. I could have cried when I saw her.
                          Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
                          Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
                          Thank you for contributing to this site.

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                          • #14
                            I was watching interviews with the cast of Grey's anatomy who all had to watch surgeons perform operations before they started shooting and they were all shocked at how relaxed- almost to the point of being unprofessional, surgeons are in the theatre. Swearing and talking about what they had for dinner the night before, not something i'd really enjoy talking about with the putrefying smell of cauterised flesh assaulting my nose . Apparently, most surgeons also have an ego the size of a planet.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BeesKnees View Post
                              Apparently, most surgeons also have an ego the size of a planet.
                              I think they have to have. They have to assume that they are right all of the time because they can't afford self doubt when they're up to their armpits in someone's chest.

                              I remember they interviewed the actor that played Anton Meyer in Holby and he said he'd followed a surgeon for a while. He said that he saw them perform a bypass in under 45 mins and another day they went into surgery at 9am and he left them at 8pm to go home as he was too tired to remain!


                              Oh and Admin, I don't usually eat more than one mince pie at a time. (Mr Kipling's fruit pies are a different matter! )
                              Linnear MRPharmS

                              Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: The biggest cause of brain damage and 100% preventable.

                              In pregnancy: 1 fag is not safe, 1 x-ray is not safe and 1 drink is not safe.



                              For handy pharmacy links try
                              pharmacistance.co.uk

                              If you like my posts or letters in the journal try my books!
                              eloquent-e-tales

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