Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

erythromycin

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • erythromycin

    Hello there,

    I am being treated for Pleurisy (which i don't think i have). Anyways i was prescribed erythromycin and i was violently sick, must have been sick around 8 times in the matter of six hours. Also the stomach cramps were agonising.
    I went back to my gp and prescribed Amoxicillin, does this treat Pleurisy? When i checked a list of anti-biotics on line it didnt seem to say it treated this. What if i am being treated for the wrong thing?

    Thanks
    Kez

  • #2
    Re: erythromycin

    Originally posted by Karatekez View Post
    Hello there,

    I am being treated for Pleurisy (which i don't think i have).
    Well, if you look on Patient UK, there is a good leaflet on it which will help you decide. There is also a link to many others' experience of pleurisy. Basically, it hurts like hell, and if it feels like your ribs are broken and poking through the skin, and they aren't, its likely to be pleurisy.

    It can be caused by viruses and /or bacteria.

    If its a virus, no antibiotic will touch it. Its a matter of taking painkilling medication and looking after yourself.

    If its a bacterial infection, then antibiotics will help to get rid of the infection, although the inflammation may take a bit longer to clear up. Amoxicillin and erythromycin are both antibiotics which should be useful in this case.

    Erythromycin does make a lot of people sick: its a common side effect of a really useful drug, unfortunately. If you have vomited repeatedly with pleurisy then I'm surprised you could get to your computer, quite frankly. The pain would have been debilitating.

    Still, if you have started with an antibiotic, you should finish the course anyway, otherwise you are selectively breeding all the strongest bacteria inside you which can damage you further, later. And even if it isn't pleurisy, then it will help most other bacterial chest infections.

    Hope this helps. Good luck!
    ....just my opinion

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: erythromycin

      Excellent reply, cannot add anything.
      johnep

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: erythromycin

        Originally posted by DavidS View Post

        It can be caused by viruses and /or bacteria.

        Hope this helps. Good luck!
        To continue the list (God forgive my alarmism!)

        Cancer
        Inhaling asbestos
        The use of certain drugs, such as nitrofurantoin
        Some types of autoimmune diseases, such as lupus

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: erythromycin

          Thanks...just wanted to make something clear. It wasn't the pleurisy that made me sick it was the Erythromycin. I was only violently sick when starting them, i was taking 8 a day, 2 four times daily at 250mg. After stopping them the sickness stopped. I have started the amoxicillin now and things seem ok.
          I do have severe pain in my ribs, been there for around 3 weeks, it resulted in a nasty cold and cough. The pain is mainly at the top of my rib cage under my breast. It hurts to take deep breaths, cough, laugh or stretch. I was only debating weather i had it because i heard the pain is supposed to be in the chest? Plus there are no other symptoms...just pain.
          Thanks for replies

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: erythromycin

            Originally posted by Karatekez View Post
            Hello there,

            I am being treated for Pleurisy (which i don't think i have)
            What makes you think it's not Pleurisy? how you describes your symptoms points to it: I think you doctor is on the money. Though I'd prefered he keeps you on a macrolide (anti-inflammatory action) and give you Roxithromycin (better compliance with one dosing regimen and superior anti-iflammatory effect to Erythromycin). Before you call me a foul, I repeat I meant to write anti-inflammatory action which is another bonus of this class of anti-biotics.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: erythromycin

              Originally posted by Shwampa View Post
              Though I'd prefered he keeps you on a macrolide (anti-inflammatory action) and give you Roxithromycin
              Don't all the macrolides share the side effect of sickness/vomiting and diahorrea? - If the patient has already shown himself sensitive to it its probably better that he try another broad spectrum antibiotic than hve to put up with a week of vomiting, unless that's absolutely necessary.......(I hope it isn't)
              ....just my opinion

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: erythromycin

                Not always true..

                Efficacy and Tolerance of Roxithromycin in Comparison with Erythromycin Stearate in Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

                Authors: Otto Paulsen et al.
                Published in: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, Volume 24, Issue 2 1992 , pages 219 - 225

                Abstract
                The efficacy and tolerance of roxithromycin 150 mg b.i.d. were compared with those of erythromycin stearate 500 mg b.i.d. in patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Out of 86 patients recruited for the study, 79 were evaluable for tolerance and 76 for efficacy. These patients were evenly distributed among the 3 investigational clinics, with 26, 25 and 28 patients, respectively. The diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections was based on clinical, laboratory, radiological and/or physical findings and, when available, bacteriological and serological findings. The duration of treatment was 10 days, with follow-up at post-treatment visits directly after treatment and 6 weeks thereafter. The clinical outcome was satisfactory with no significant difference between the drugs. More patients reporting adverse events were on erythromycin than on roxithromycin (51.3% vs 17.5%; p=0.003). The results suggest that roxithromycin is as effective as erythromycin stearate in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections and causes fewer adverse effects

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: erythromycin

                  So, what exactly is roxithromycin. Does it have a proprietary name and marketed in Uk?
                  johnep

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: erythromycin

                    Can't see it listed in BNF online and a google search doesn't find anything related to a UK product

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: erythromycin

                      Originally posted by Shwampa View Post
                      Not always true..
                      etc etc
                      Wow! Prepare for lots of PM's from students!

                      I don't think its available over here, though
                      ....just my opinion

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: erythromycin

                        The known brand is Rulide. I can't believe it's not available in the UK!!!

                        BNF

                        5.1.5 Macrolides

                        Erythromycin has an antibacterial spectrum that is similar but not identical to that of penicillin; it is thus an alternative in penicillin-allergic patients.

                        Indications for erythromycin include respiratory infections, whooping cough, legionnaires’ disease, and campylobacter enteritis. It is active against many penicillin-resistant staphylococci but some are now also resistant to erythromycin; it has poor activity against Haemophilus influenzae. Erythromycin is also active against chlamydia and mycoplasmas.

                        Erythromycin causes nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea in some patients; in mild to moderate infections this can be avoided by giving a lower dose (250 mg 4 times daily) but if a more serious infection, such as Legionella pneumonia, is suspected higher doses are needed.

                        Azithromycin is a macrolide with slightly less activity than erythromycin against Gram-positive bacteria but enhanced activity against some Gram-negative organisms including H. influenzae. Plasma concentrations are very low but tissue concentrations are much higher. It has a long tissue half-life and once daily dosage is recommended. For treatment of Lyme disease, see section 5.1.1.3. Azithromycin is also used in the treatment of trachoma [unlicensed indication] (section 11.3.1).

                        Clarithromycin is an erythromycin derivative with slightly greater activity than the parent compound. Tissue concentrations are higher than with erythromycin. It is given twice daily.

                        Azithromycin and clarithromycin cause fewer gastro-intestinal side-effects than erythromycin.

                        Spiramycin is also a macrolide (section 5.4.7).

                        The ketolide telithromycin is a derivative of erythromycin. The antibacterial spectrum of telithromycin is similar to that of macrolides and it is also active against penicillin- and erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Telithromycin should only be used to treat beta-haemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis, sinusitis, community-acquired pneumonia, and exacerbations of chronic bronchitis if caused by organisms resistant to beta-lactam antibacterials and other macrolides, or if conventional treatment is contra-indicated.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: erythromycin

                          We are not worthy.
                          Don't Stop Believing

                          http://youtube.com/watch?v=rnT7nYbCSvM

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: erythromycin

                            Well i stopped the Erythromycin and started on Amoxicillin. I have been taking the Amoxicillin for three days now but so far not feeling any better...i can't even hiccup without having pain. I'm also finding it hard to spread them out throughout the day, as i am only taking three tablets a day..can anyone suggest how many hours apart i should be taking them?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: erythromycin

                              Tablets of amoxicillin? Never seen them. Three times a day of 24 hours is every eight hours.
                              johnep

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X