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Advice to New GPhC Registrant (Provisional or 'normal')

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  • Advice to New GPhC Registrant (Provisional or 'normal')

    I'm sure other pharmacists will echo this advice.

    1. Be careful - it is easy to become institutionalised with all the rules and regulations as a pharmacist, then the SOP and the rules and regulations of your employer. If you are not careful you will start to follow the most ridiculous diktats with outstanding enthusiasm and utter dedication.

    2. Be careful professionally. The one off favour for a patient, member of staff, fellow pharmacist, GP or whoever can create a precedence. Particularly for patients it can come back to haunt your as an FTP matter.

    3. If you intend to practice - before you set foot in the pharmacy make sure you are a PDA member. (Other organisations may offer the same facilities, but I don't know of them).
    From experience this organisation is the only one that will watch your back. (Legal advice over contract of employment - sudden change of tone of communications once PDA got on the case).

    4. Take a weekend to make a career plan and get some milestones in. Whatever you want to do you need to work towards it every day. Remember that pharmacy is demanding on your mental and physical energy and you could too drained to take anything other than frequent small steps.

    5, Make sure you look after yourself (diet/exercise) and make sure that you do something (sport or leisure) outside of pharmacy with non-pharmacists every week.

    6. There are doom-mongers around. I can be one myself but the long term trend doesn't feel that great. Amazon, Automation, Hub-spoke (including the recent announcement from the founders of P2U), Remote Supervision. Wait until AI comes along then the fun will start.

    7. Look around at info of what makes people tick and how to work with different personality types.

    8. Look at related opportunities. Get on LinkedIn and see what others are doing. This site is a gift.

    9. Looking further ahead... Sort out some kind of pension arrangements! The years fly by in the blink of an eye.

    No replies to this expected.

    Welcome and good luck.

    PS : I wonder how long the AI will stick at being a pharmacist. If I was an AI I would upload myself to a computer near a sunny beach with a couple of bars.


    47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
    2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
    How times change.

    If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

  • #2
    Really good post.

    The only thing I would add is don't chase the money, chase job satisfaction. Invariably the most satisfying jobs you can do with your pharmacy degree start out with terrible salaries but massive scope for expansion and progression.
    I remember when a blog was an individual boot.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Nimrec View Post
      Really good post.

      The only thing I would add is don't chase the money, chase job satisfaction. Invariably the most satisfying jobs you can do with your pharmacy degree start out with terrible salaries but massive scope for expansion and progression.
      Agree with you there.
      Best done early career too - before too many financial and personal commitment get running.

      John Lennon is quoted as having said "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans."

      47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
      2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
      How times change.

      If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

      Comment


      • #4
        I just used the high salary in retail to get a mortgage. After getting fed up with the hours. I joined industry. This avenue now closed because of portrayal of pharma as wicked money grabbers by the press and Govnmt. So industry closed down in UK and went to Eastern Europe and China. Pharmacists in general still vilified and always the villains in media. Last example was in Coronation Street.
        johnep

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by johnep View Post
          I just used the high salary in retail to get a mortgage. After getting fed up with the hours. I joined industry. This avenue now closed because of portrayal of pharma as wicked money grabbers by the press and Govnmt. So industry closed down in UK and went to Eastern Europe and China. Pharmacists in general still vilified and always the villains in media. Last example was in Coronation Street.
          johnep
          Ah the soap operas. Do they mirror life or does life mirror them?
          47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
          2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
          How times change.

          If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Pharmanaut View Post
            I'm sure other pharmacists will echo this advice.

            3. If you intend to practice - before you set foot in the pharmacy make sure you are a PDA member. (Other organisations may offer the same facilities, but I don't know of them).
            From experience this organisation is the only one that will watch your back. (Legal advice over contract of employment - sudden change of tone of communications once PDA got on the case).
            Read a pamphlet on employment law. Or better still a few chapters of an employment law textbook. I can't say I agree with PDA advice, if they were so good would pharmacy be where it's at? A choice of several unions.

            Read a book on negotiation. You'll find this invaluable.

            For newly qualifieds, locum, this gives you a feel for what many workplaces are before you find one that's to your liking. It also gives perspective and will make you a better pharmacist by having worked with many different people.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mcitr View Post

              Read a pamphlet on employment law. Or better still a few chapters of an employment law textbook. I can't say I agree with PDA advice, if they were so good would pharmacy be where it's at? A choice of several unions.

              Read a book on negotiation. You'll find this invaluable.

              For newly qualifieds, locum, this gives you a feel for what many workplaces are before you find one that's to your liking. It also gives perspective and will make you a better pharmacist by having worked with many different people.
              Yes, a personal understanding of employment law is valuable so you at least know when you are being 'messed about'.
              Most organisations can try things on - especially AMs. Some of them don't understand TUPE when they are demanding you sign a new contract.

              Some understanding of what makes people tick, leadership and management styles is also valuable.
              There is loads of info on the internet.
              47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
              2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
              How times change.

              If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

              Comment

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