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  • Britain in the EU

    Hi. I just wondered what people thought about our position in the EU. Obviously it's great for people from eastern europe who have the chance of a better life, but what about people in the west. It's just I read that all major pharmacy chains are actively recruiting in Poland and I was a bit concerned. As a relatively new pharmacist I thought I had a secure future but its looking quite bleak now. There's already a problem with new doctors and physios being able to find work due to poor management and the same here. It's nice to know the RPSGB is looking out for us UK graduates, not. Also allowing GPS to set up a pharmacy in every surgery, thats genius. It's really going to help the real community pharmacies. Obviously 200k a year isn't enough for them! Also why did they end the reciprocal agreement with Oz a fellow Commonwealth member. We had stronger ties with them and India, Pakistan etc than Lithuiania et al. If they reopened agreement a great number of people would prob move (including myself) therefore creating more jobs.

  • #2
    Re: Britain in the EU

    Quite agree with you. I did not vote for joining europe in 1973. When I was in export I covered the english speaking countries in the caribbean, Africa and the Med, also far east. The legacy of empire was a considerable sentiment towards the 'old country'. We used to have commonwealth preference which meant we traded on preferential mutual terms with our former colonies.

    A New Zealand pharmacist told me that they had a 'butter mountain' to try to sell when they lost the UK as a major market.

    Certainly when I was on a Far East tour, I was glad to reach Hong Kong from Thailand where I had felt a bit strange.

    The main result of joining the EU has been the take over of our assets by the continentals. (Latest being the Post Office).
    johnep

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    • #3
      Re: Britain in the EU

      Well, I voted FOR in 1973 and I've no reason to think I'd do differently if we voted again. I think it was tough for a bit for New Zealand especially for a couple of years, but they seem to have weathered that storm and when we were there in 2006 the place looked very good.

      I believe that as well as our common heritage with Oz, NZ & Canada we also have one with Europe, and particularly Western Europe, and given the fact that the Commonwealth, as a political unit, was spinning apart, then becoming "part of Europe" was and is the only way to go. I must, though, confess to some reservations about Eastern Europe. Although not a Christian myself, I think a great deal of that "common heritage" derives from our shared experience of the Catholic Church and the Reformation.

      As for allowing pharmacists in from elsewhere in Europe; well, the possibilities exist to go the other way as well. You just have to learn another language, and too many "little englanders" throw up their hands in horror at that idea; too difficult, not for us. Rubbish. That attitude is straightforward imperialism and translates as English is good enough for us, so it ought to be good enough for Johnny Foreigner! There are, apparently, now schools in Spain which have to teach in English and Spanish because of the number of English speakers children, and not only that; the parents create at having to learn Spanish.

      One point where newby82 does hit the nail on the head is when he (?) writes of "poor management". One of the features of the Thatcherite 80's is that bright people were dissuaded from entering "public service" where in fact the UK had a great tradition, dating back over 100 years of encouraging such people to do so. "Making money" and "The City" were the places to be and manufacturing and public service denigrated.

      As for the work of the RPSGB; what exactly does Newby82 mean by "real community pharmacies"? Hair dye and perfumery?

      Rant over!

      PS. Merlin & Mrs M go to Thailand quite a lot; not the conventional tourist areas either. We like it, and Mrs M feels safe there. Much safer than one or two other places we've been.

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      • #4
        Re: Britain in the EU

        Well it was nearly 40 years ago that I was there, before it became a tourist destination.
        johnep

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        • #5
          Re: Britain in the EU

          From an Irish point of view, and as part of the "eurozone", it is becoming increasingly obvious that the tide is beginning to turn. Foreign nationals, particularly Polish, who make up the vast majority of the immigrant work-force are being made redundant at an alarming rate.

          Many of them are returning home, as the Polish economy appears to be fairly bouyant now, compared to the way it was, and the current strength of the euro gives them even more reason to do so.

          A Polish security guard I know recently bought a site in Poland, and is shortly returning home to build a house. He made enough money in Ireland to do so, whereas he could not as a fully-qualified HGV driver in Poland.

          I feel the current global economic situation is forcing a gradual return to the previous "status quo"

          Fleeg.
          Last edited by Fleegle; 18, December 2008, 02:51 PM.
          Don't Stop Believing

          http://youtube.com/watch?v=rnT7nYbCSvM

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          • #6
            Re: Britain in the EU

            Originally posted by Fleegle View Post

            I feel the current global economic situation is forcing a gradual return to the previous "status quo"

            Fleeg.
            What, Fleegle, goes around also comes around!

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            • #7
              Re: Britain in the EU

              Europe had it's own butter, beef and cheese mountain to get rid of in the 80's and it was given out, free, to those on benefits. Butter is still some what of a luxury in our house and I can believe it's not butter especially on toast.
              I was far too young to vote to join Europe but my parents thought they were doing my generation a favour by voting yes. If I did have the opportunity I really don't know how I would vote.
              Make some one smile today.

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              • #8
                Re: Britain in the EU

                Originally posted by jaymags View Post
                I was far too young to vote to join Europe but my parents thought they were doing my generation a favour by voting yes. If I did have the opportunity I really don't know how I would vote.
                You have to remember that much of the Press in this country is controlled by people who for their own commercial reasons, which are nothing to do with the best interests of the UK, are opposed to Europe. Partly, of course, this is because the EU is looking to impose employment standards on firms within it's boundaries and these people want the "right" to hire and fire etc as they see fit, without any regard for human rights. Partly, too, they have considerable interests in the US and see the development of a strong Europe as a threat to the dominance of the US.

                If the Mail, the Express and the Murdoch group are opposed to something, then that, to my mind, is a good reason to support it!

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