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  • RP rebalancing.

    https://www.chemistanddruggist.co.uk...tion-responses

    As pharmacists we need to ensure that it remains 'one pharmacist on site'.

    Don't forget that employing pharmacists is a 'drag on profits'.

    Evolving to remote supervision is one thing.
    Bear in mind that remote could be really remote....
    A GPhC registered pharmacist could be located anywhere where there are telecomms.
    Not necessarily within the UK either.
    Wherever you can get a 'cheap pharmacist'.

    47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
    2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
    How times change.

    If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

  • #2
    I feel like pharmacists can be their own worst enemies most of the time and that is the biggest issue facing us. It's not what the government is doing, but what we're doing that worries me. As a profession, we need to get together and take more control of our sector. These companies like Lloyds, Boots etc will take advantage of these rebalancing act and squeeze whatever they can out of it, and frankly, this is really due to pharmacists letting them get away with it. Look at the abysmal locum rates for example.

    As for remote supervision, if anyone would want me to supervise for example 2 pharmacies, then they'll have to pay me the salary of 2 pharmacists. Simple as that. But good luck getting all pharmacists having this mentality at the moment. There are many people in the profession that are willing to take any rates to do the job.
    As long pharmacists act passive, things will get worst for us. NHS won't help us. Government won't help us. GPhC won't help us, we need to take control.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mpharm. View Post
      I feel like pharmacists can be their own worst enemies most of the time and that is the biggest issue facing us. It's not what the government is doing, but what we're doing that worries me. As a profession, we need to get together and take more control of our sector. These companies like Lloyds, Boots etc will take advantage of these rebalancing act and squeeze whatever they can out of it, and frankly, this is really due to pharmacists letting them get away with it. Look at the abysmal locum rates for example.

      As for remote supervision, if anyone would want me to supervise for example 2 pharmacies, then they'll have to pay me the salary of 2 pharmacists. Simple as that. But good luck getting all pharmacists having this mentality at the moment. There are many people in the profession that are willing to take any rates to do the job.
      As long pharmacists act passive, things will get worst for us. NHS won't help us. Government won't help us. GPhC won't help us, we need to take control.
      Years ago we wanted to know why had to start delivering for free, MDS for free, this for free, that for free.
      Now 'for free' is as stick to beat us with; more for free to stop people going to the even more for free competition.

      Exactly - regardless of what the government does.
      Most have come to the conclusion that as pharmacists we no longer own the means to practice our profession or have any influence over how we can practice it.
      As soon as one pharmacists gives a little then they are used to drive the wedge into the rest of us.
      I think there is only one organisation that has a care about the rank-and-file and that is the one appropriately operating from an old fire station!
      The whole job is a constant whirl of reprioritisation from moment-to-moment in a game where one slip is a disaster.


      47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
      2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
      How times change.

      If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

      Comment


      • #4
        I attended a meeting following the Lee case about decriminalisation of dispensing errors many years ago. Not sure if it has happened yet.
        johnep

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by johnep View Post
          I attended a meeting following the Lee case about decriminalisation of dispensing errors many years ago. Not sure if it has happened yet.
          johnep
          A harmful error is tragedy and no-one would try to detract from that.
          It has 'kind of happened' but there is still a risk of criminal record.
          Plus the 'go after the pharmacist' if things go wrong somewhere else will also remain.
          This risk is increasing every minute as we are the last link in the chain with everyone else before being in the 'under pressure NHS'.
          One slip up the chain that slips through any other safety barrier(s) drops the error into our laps.
          It all seems normal to those joining the profession but unsure if they understand the risks they are exposed to every minute.
          47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
          2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
          How times change.

          If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

          Comment


          • #6
            Back in the 80’s I did a survey of community pharmacy activities in Essex. I was quite surprised by the number of people who had recently started free delivery services. Back when I was a community pharmacist we only delivered oxygen, unless the patient had real problems.
            I don’t think, either that it’s good for elderly people, like me, to sit in their house and wait for medicines to be delivered. A bit of exercise is a Good Thing! Incidentally, I note that the local (dispensing) surgery does NOT operate a delivery service, resulting in the daft situation that patients in the town can get their medicines delivered, but if they live out in the country they have to drive in to collect them!
            On MDS I remember, just before they were introduced into UK, meeting an Aussie pharmacist, who was already using them who urged ‘don't give ‘em away, mate. The Home’s soon realise how much they need them and they’ll be glad to pay.’
            The late Graeme Stafford was a pharmacist of whom I had a very high opinion, but he did a deal with Boots to supply them free, with the result we all know.
            Last edited by Merlyn; 8th, November 2018, 07:05 AM. Reason: Left out an important word. I had a very ‘high’ opinion of Graeme.

            Comment


            • #7
              I remember that many years ago, the shoe was visiting Drs surgeries to press for collection of scripts on behalf of pts convenience. Soon all pharmacies were doing it. Deliveries started in a similar fashion. P2U was made possible by electronic prescribing. Adverts on daytime TV nearly every day now.
              johnep

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by johnep View Post
                I remember that many years ago, the shoe was visiting Drs surgeries to press for collection of scripts on behalf of pts convenience. Soon all pharmacies were doing it. Deliveries started in a similar fashion. P2U was made possible by electronic prescribing. Adverts on daytime TV nearly every day now.
                johnep
                My memory says that it wasn’t ‘the shoe’ which started deliveries. My ‘private’ small group had a collection service for repeats back in to 70’s.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Merlyn View Post

                  My memory says that it wasn’t ‘the shoe’ which started deliveries. My ‘private’ small group had a collection service for repeats back in to 70’s.
                  P2U have been sending out letters as well.
                  A non-pharmacy acquaintance received one and commented how much like an official communication it looked.
                  Though to be honest the number of prescription items is ever increasing so I'm not sure if many have capacity to cope with this.
                  How did we get to the situation where almost every prescription is four items upwards - are we over-medicating people?
                  Is it a sign that it is difficult to optimise each patient and item just keep getting added on?

                  47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
                  2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
                  How times change.

                  If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

                  Comment

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