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  • At Last!

    The health authority now want all pts to prove they are entitled to NHS treatment. About time. Lagos will be upset! My wife has to produce proof in form of passport or other suitable documentation.
    Sorry cannot post the form as photobucket no longer works for me and cannot post pic directly although reduced file size.
    johnep
    Last edited by johnep; 7th, December 2017, 02:11 PM.

  • #2
    What will happen if they are not entitled to NHS treatment ?

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    • #3
      Then you either go somewhere else or pay up. Already happened to us, had to prove our residency permits and proof of income. This should have been done yonks ago, it feels as if the noose is very tight on the finances now.

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      • #4
        Yes, Even when visiting EU take out insurance. Have read stories in the press about people who have not done so and find owe thousands to the health systems abroad.
        johnep

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        • #5
          What a horrifying idea. As someone who lives in a fairly poor area I know how many 'homegrowns' don't have passports or driving licences and the bureaucratic and stressful hoops jobseekers have to go through. It will end up putting a large bureaucratic strain on the system if done fairly and equally for everyone or racial (or other forms of judgemental) profiling if not.

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          • #6
            Have done it in General Practice in past. If no passport, driving licence, etc can always use rent book, employers certification, benefits records, birth certificate, etc

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            • mcitr
              mcitr commented
              Editing a comment
              That sounds somewhat more generous in terms of accepted ID than other schemes. Unfortunately the more acceptable forms you take the complexicity on the system and time/cost making it fairer.

          • #7
            if you open any account, usually have to prove residence with a utility bill and some other ID. This is no different. ID cards would be much simpler. However, liberal groups would protest.
            johnep

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            • #8
              Originally posted by johnep View Post
              if you open any account, usually have to prove residence with a utility bill and some other ID. This is no different. ID cards would be much simpler. However, liberal groups would protest.
              johnep
              I think that checks on bank accounts have gone too far the other way. One of those things in life where it went from minimalist, you can see why it changed and we've gone far, far too far in the other direction.

              There's also a world of difference between say someone who doesn't require to make any changes, has established themselves lived in this country, are white, 'sound' British and someone without all of those things.

              ID cards! It's usually white, elderly, well off people that are not going to be inconvenienced and have wealth to lose that want them. Contrast that with say a black, young man, who is poor and who is going to be hassled a lot by the authorities and police...

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              • #9
                Surely production of an ID card would instantly reassure the police. However, the thread is about the NHS becoming an International Health Service and how to prevent health tourism. A healthy black young male unlikely to be affected. An advanced pregnant lady from Nigeria more likely.
                johnep

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by johnep View Post
                  if you open any account, usually have to prove residence with a utility bill and some other ID. This is no different. ID cards would be much simpler. However, liberal groups would protest.
                  johnep
                  Most EU countries have an ID card don't they?
                  Most of the time the internet is full of daft opinions and views that you should not take seriously let bother you at all.
                  Note : If this posting contains personal views or opinions every endeavour is made to ensure they stay within social media guidelines.
                  If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by johnep View Post
                    Surely production of an ID card would instantly reassure the police. However, the thread is about the NHS becoming an International Health Service and how to prevent health tourism. A healthy black young male unlikely to be affected. An advanced pregnant lady from Nigeria more likely.
                    johnep
                    John, I'm with you all the way on the principle of this. But the practicalities: how could we possibly deny medical care to a pregnant woman? and the "healthy" young man might be infected with HIV, Hepatitis C, Syphilis, Gonorreah, Chlamydia, TB.....and go on to infect dozens, meaning eventually a larger bill than obstetric care.

                    My view is: foreign nationals who have not paid NHI should 1) get treatment and their Nation billed through their Embassy. OR 2) all foreign nationals entering should pay x months worth of NHI stamps and therefore be contributing to the NI scheme and be entitled to treatment. To avoid the obvious, a declaration of a "clean bill of health" should be a visa requirement.

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                    • #12
                      Don’t quite understand this, since I don’t read in detail newspapers to the Right of the ‘i’. Are people in N. Cambridgeshireshire going to have to produce evidence every time they get NHS treatment, or only on first treeatment? And if so, is that first treatment for anything, or on each new ‘first treatment’? As Mutley says, how about the practicalities?
                      Secondly, I have a daughter-in-law who isn’t a UK citizen, although (obviously) married to one? She doesn’t live in UK, but comes to visit us every so often, with her husband.our son and the grandchildren. The latter have dual citizenship.... or will have when they are 18. What happens to them?

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by the old merlin View Post
                        Don’t quite understand this, since I don’t read in detail newspapers to the Right of the ‘i’. Are people in N. Cambridgeshireshire going to have to produce evidence every time they get NHS treatment, or only on first treeatment? And if so, is that first treatment for anything, or on each new ‘first treatment’? As Mutley says, how about the practicalities?
                        Secondly, I have a daughter-in-law who isn’t a UK citizen, although (obviously) married to one? She doesn’t live in UK, but comes to visit us every so often, with her husband.our son and the grandchildren. The latter have dual citizenship.... or will have when they are 18. What happens to them?


                        Merlin, I am not a lawyer but fwiw your DiL should apply for British nationality (if she wants that) ASAP. Again, fwiw iirc marriage to a British subject confers a right of residence but not Nationality.

                        Documents and records in foreign jurisdictions can take some time to recover so it's best to start the process ASAP.

                        Best to have a word with a lawyer who does this sort of work if they want to go ahead.


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                        • #14
                          There is guidance on who would have to pay including examples of who would pay and who would be exempt which includes vulnerable people asylum seakers, children, pregnant women etc. There is also a list of treatments that remain free regadless of the resident status which includes HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases as well as a number of other contagious diseases (eg epidemic flu).
                          I'm not convinced that once you have checked everybody then gone through those that may not be eligible for free treatment under an international agreement and chceked the treamnet and resident status etc. that there will be any great saving to the NHS. A separate department will be needed to police this and ensure payment. What happens if a person can't pay for treatment they have received?
                          Guidance for NHS bodies who need to make and recover hospital charges from overseas visitors.
                          [I]Nice information. I like your information very much. It is a perfect information that clears all my doubts and gives a clear idea regarding that. It is really advantageous for me.I would definably take the benefit of it.[/I]

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                          • #15
                            Billing of foreign nations for treatment of their citizens is reported as rarely done and often the country concerned does not pay up.
                            All visitors to UK should carry insurance as we have to do when going abroad. When in the US, first question asked is which insurance company.
                            johnep

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