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  • Very confused pharmacist.

    Dear all

    I've been qualified since 2013. I've worked in community pharmacy as a permanent and locum pharmacists in those 7 years. I have come to a point in my life, I am asking myself if I could do this until retirement? It started out ok back in 2013, I was new to the profession and I had enthuthiasm. Seven years later, I am asking myself whether I can continue or whether I need a change of career. These are my problems with my last 7 years as a pharmacist. I do suffer with a functional social anxiety. This is not good when your having to deal with people all day, everyday and you are mildly anxious all the time. It takes its toll after a while especially when locuming and having to meet new people(staff) and new computer systems. Repetitive nature, pressures due to service targets, paperwork, no real increase in salary over 7 years ect.

    I post this because I thought there must be pharmacists in similar situations? I am asking for wisdom from follow pharmacist who may have been in similar situations. I've looked at industry opportunities, but have realised without further studying it is not easy to get into. I've searched other opportunities for pharmacist, but I am struggling to find anything apart from community, hospital or your typical industry jobs. I know you maybe thinking why you chose to do pharmacy in the first place? At 18 years old I didn't have a clue what I wanted to do as career for the rest of my life. I should have been more wise, but in reality at 18 I was young and dumb. I don't want to make any rash decisions that I regret in the future and hence I have come for advice.

    Many thanks

    Rik


  • #2
    Maybe this story might give you some ideas. I’ve been told that down south they can’t recruit enough pharmacists to work in primary care networks. Depending on where you live in the UK it might be an avenue you could explore?

    https://www.pharmacy-forum.co.uk/for...new-beginnings
    Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
    Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
    Thank you for contributing to this site.

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    • #3
      Very true. The South West and East Anglia have always had a pharmacist "shortage". One reason why I retired to East Anglia and was never short of work.
      johnep

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      • #4
        Industry are always looking for pharmacists. The salaries generally begin in the low to mid-20's but there's significant upward mobility once as long as you can prove yourself.

        Job postings usually request a life sciences or pharmacy degree.
        I remember when a blog was an individual boot.

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        • #5
          Hi riks!

          Like a few people have mentioned, I think moving into GP practice/CCG is the easiest way out of community at the moment without a massive pay cut. I find it's a rewarding job without so much pressure, and you could even find a position in medicines optimisation where you have very little contact with the public.

          Other than that, a change in career is not such a crazy thing, how is someone supposed to know what they want to do for the rest of their lives at 18? I considered at some point to do something related to scientific translation as I love languages so much. I didn't follow through in the end (because I'm too lazy) but I found while I was working on that project the everyday job was more bearable.

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          • #6
            To escape from retail, I became a Medical rep. A great life in the 60s with few other reps and we were welcomed by the Drs.
            This led to a Marketing job in my 30s where I had my first trip overseas (Far East). I then became an Export Manager selling bulk Vitamins in Ireland, Africa, the Mead and Caribbean. This job folded when the markets were taken over by the parent company in Switzerland. So, after a year in retail I was back as a Med rep again until I retired from industry and became a locum during its heyday.
            Now all is changed and i would not be a pharmacist again.
            johnep.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by johnep View Post
              Very true. The South West and East Anglia have always had a pharmacist "shortage". One reason why I retired to East Anglia and was never short of work.
              johnep
              depends where in east anglia tbh. i can guarantee there arent shortages in bedfordshire (and the irony is uni of bedfordshire is starting a pharmacy course)

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              • #8
                Very true. Pharmacy was seen as a way of working for yourself and has been very popular among Asian immigrants. Thus no shortage of pharmacists in areas with large Asian origin population. In Bedfordshire you have Luton. no shortages in Manchester, London or Leicester. I was a career officer for Bedfordshire branch and attended school career evenings. Found most enquiries were how to become a Dr. Pharmacy was second choice. To me Bedfordhsire is part of South Midlands. East Anglia starts in Cambridgeshire and Essex.
                Medical education is tied to teaching hospitals, but pharmacy can be taught anywhere and as a popular course is seen as a cash cow for the unis.
                johnep

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by johnep View Post
                  Very true. Pharmacy was seen as a way of working for yourself and has been very popular among Asian immigrants. Thus no shortage of pharmacists in areas with large Asian origin population. In Bedfordshire you have Luton. no shortages in Manchester, London or Leicester. I was a career officer for Bedfordshire branch and attended school career evenings. Found most enquiries were how to become a Dr. Pharmacy was second choice. To me Bedfordhsire is part of South Midlands. East Anglia starts in Cambridgeshire and Essex.
                  Medical education is tied to teaching hospitals, but pharmacy can be taught anywhere and as a popular course is seen as a cash cow for the unis.
                  johnep
                  tbf, bedford is a very large caucasian population (likewise leighton buzzard and dunstable) yet there places are quite saturated.

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                  • #10
                    also dont forget, uni of bed is predominantly foreign students who dont have the grads to get into a decent, non-RG uni, for people who cant relocate outside of Beds or for UK students doing predominantly vocational courses.

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