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What would you advise a student wanting to study pharmacy at University?

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  • #16
    The thing that gets me is.... I've had kids of family members, students and my own relatives ask me about my thoughts on Pharmacy and whether it's a degree worth studying and I say what I think but then they still go on and study pharmacy at University. They then realise when studying the course and in the case of two family friends, they realise when it's too late!

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    • #17
      Catching a rising trend is difficult. some of us bought into Maneks fund as he had won the Sunday Times fantasy fund competition. At one time our stake was worth 3 times as much. So, we did not sell and down he plunged like Icarus... his fund was mainly in dotcom shares and crashed in 2008. Since then the shares have never reached parity with the issue price. We took a loss and got out.
      johnep

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      • #18
        Originally posted by johnep View Post
        Catching a rising trend is difficult. some of us bought into Maneks fund as he had won the Sunday Times fantasy fund competition. At one time our stake was worth 3 times as much. So, we did not sell and down he plunged like Icarus... his fund was mainly in dotcom shares and crashed in 2008. Since then the shares have never reached parity with the issue price. We took a loss and got out.
        johnep
        Hi John I think in investing catching a trend is the worst thing you can do. Rather the question is if the business is sustainable. Now Dotcom shares collapsed because the whole thing was a bubble anything ending with the suffix dot.com was instantly worth $100 million of dollar. I think to most rationale person that would seem crazy a business is only worth based on the income it generates. To me it seems like someone pricing real estate on the Moon to the same level as Central London. I am also surprised it collapsed in 2008 because most dot.com shares were wiped out in 2000 to 2001.

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        • #19
          Perhaps it did, a long time ago now.
          johnep

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          • #20
            Hi, I've just started the buttercups pharmacy technician course and was wondering if anyone could help with a question about the screening process?

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            • #21
              Beverley, Now the third time you have posted the same question. Next time I will delete any duplicates.
              johnep

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              • #22
                If I had my time again.....Osteopathy

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                • #23
                  The question is: What would you advise a student wanting to study pharmacy at University?

                  So the student has not, as yet, commenced the course.

                  My advice would be: If you can afford it; take a gap year and think it over.

                  Take a look at how "transportable" the degree in Pharmacy is compared with other STEM subjects. Do you really see many Pharmacists move into, say, Finance or upper management compared with Mathematicians, Statisticians, Physicists, Psychologists or Doctors.

                  Note that, as has been posted here, you will end up with a Master's Degree and hence be inelligible for funding for another Master's.

                  Note that at the moment you can still earn reasonably good money as a pharmacist locum, then ask yourself how long that will last and whether you want to put up with it for the rest of your life with little prospect of advancement.

                  Take a good look at skilled trades: electrician, c/h engineer, plumber.

                  You can go to University later in life as a mature student, this might become the model in the future.
                  Last edited by Mutley; 16th, May 2019, 07:47 AM.

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                  • #24
                    I think students must realise that the political pressure for higher education was mainly a way of reducing youth unemployment. The govnmt of the day gave little thought for the prospects of students with media study students getting jobs.
                    johnep

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Mutley View Post
                      The question is: What would you advise a student wanting to study pharmacy at University?

                      So the student has not, as yet, commenced the course.

                      My advice would be: If you can afford it; take a gap year and think it over.

                      Take a look at how "transportable" the degree in Pharmacy is compared with other STEM subjects. Do you really see many Pharmacists move into, say, Finance or upper management compared with Mathematicians, Statisticians, Physicists, Psychologists or Doctors.

                      Note that, as has been posted here, you will end up with a Master's Degree and hence be inelligible for funding for another Master's.

                      Note that at the moment you can still earn reasonably good money as a pharmacist locum, then ask yourself how long that will last and whether you want to put up with it for the rest of your life with little prospect of advancement.

                      Take a good look at skilled trades: electrician, c/h engineer, plumber.

                      You can go to University later in life as a mature student, this might become the model in the future.
                      Sound advice I think if people finished their A-levles then try getting a job and do different things that way you can actually find something you want to do. I think its crazy how as a kid we are forced to make a decision which has a long term effect but we lack the experience and knowledge to make a constructive decision. Personally I think an MPharm degree is a big no no beause if you do a BSc then you have the option to apply loans to do a Masters degree such as MBA which is valued quite highly and offers career progression.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by jzd4rma View Post

                        Sound advice I think if people finished their A-levles then try getting a job and do different things that way you can actually find something you want to do. I think its crazy how as a kid we are forced to make a decision which has a long term effect but we lack the experience and knowledge to make a constructive decision. Personally I think an MPharm degree is a big no no beause if you do a BSc then you have the option to apply loans to do a Masters degree such as MBA which is valued quite highly and offers career progression.
                        Sound advice.
                        I don't think the reality of the work/life balance in pharmacy is explained to prospectives.
                        Plus you can sacrifice your own physical and mental health on the job.
                        Forum members will have seen some of us posting about this.
                        47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
                        2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
                        How times change.

                        If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Pharmanaut View Post

                          Sound advice.
                          I don't think the reality of the work/life balance in pharmacy is explained to prospectives.
                          Plus you can sacrifice your own physical and mental health on the job.
                          Forum members will have seen some of us posting about this.
                          A lot of people go on about the number of career 'choices' available today and the amount of information. I agree about the former, but the latter there is too much or people simply ignore it.

                          Mentioned up thread, but I think that people who are 14-18 make decisions on themes about jobs, not what they are specifically told, this is why negative stuff is screened out. In the worst cases these themes are rammed home by parents who should know better. Often people in my experiences only listen to add to these themes by adding positive stuff from someone early in that career - perhaps a 1st or 2nd year pharmacy student, perhaps a 3rd year Psychology student etc. People want to talk to a 1st/2nd year student who'll give them positive feedback, that what they have already decided is all right to do. Everything else is screened out.

                          So these themes are something along the lines of media discourse -

                          Doctor, the top of the tree
                          Pharmacist, well paid and prestigious.
                          Clinical Psychologist, top of the tree in a sexy subject that everyone should want to do.
                          English/Politics want to be a journalist, creative, not bound by traditional boring job and can make a difference.

                          Another explanation is people build their self identity around studying to be a doctor/pharmacist/psychologist/journalist.

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                          • #28
                            Well, in the DM today a journalist working freelance (but only for the DM so could be in trouble with the HMRC) said he earned some £85,000 a year not working full time. In his early days, Phil Brown acted as a scientific journalist so that must have set him up for his later career. Pharmacists are well qualified for scientific journalism.
                            johnep

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by johnep View Post
                              Well, in the DM today a journalist working freelance (but only for the DM so could be in trouble with the HMRC) said he earned some £85,000 a year not working full time. In his early days, Phil Brown acted as a scientific journalist so that must have set him up for his later career. Pharmacists are well qualified for scientific journalism.
                              johnep
                              I would be very sceptical about people wanting to go into journalism.

                              Like pharmacy the funding model is broken.

                              Every English/Politics/History/Media studies student wants to go into journalism. Lot of unpaid internships.

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                              • #30
                                Suspect same as getting into TV. Depends on who you know.
                                johnep

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