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MCQ books for pre regs

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  • MCQ books for pre regs

    Has anyone used any of the MCQ books to prepare for the pre reg exam?

    In particular I am wondering whether to get further MCQs in pharmacy practice or pass the preregistartion exam as they are the most uptodate. Has anyone any experience of either? which is best?

    I hope this post is ok in this section as since there isn't a pre reg section I wasn't sure where to put it!

    thanks

  • #2
    Go to the student forum on USA site. USA has initial exam with 200 mcqs and you will find these there plus links to book sites (pharmacyexam.cm) etc.
    johnep

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    • #3
      The best thing you can do is to get all the RPSGB sample papers for the last five or six years.

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      • #4
        where can you get all the sample papers from the last 5 - 6years .The only ones ive got are the ones on the rpsgb website

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        • #5
          Do you know anyone who has sat pre-reg in the last couple of years? I did my pre-reg in hospital and they had a lever arc file full of sample papers going back ten years.

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          • #6
            Reference Guide For The Pharmacy College Admission Test (For PCAT Preparation)
            Author Manan H Shroff
            Edition First edition 2005-2006


            Description 700 questions with answers and complete explanations. It includes:

            1. 200 questions on general biology, microbiology, and human anatomy and physiology.

            2. 200 problems on algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, pre-calculus, trigonometry and calculus.

            3. 200 questions on inorganic and elementary organic chemistry.

            4. 45 questions on general, non-scientific word knowledge, analogies and sentence completion.

            5. 40 practice questions for Reading Comprehension.


            NOTE: Study more in Science and Math. They give more bearing in this area.

            This is example of the PCAT exam in the USA.
            johnep

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            • #7
              Past sample papers are very useful. The society also send you a couple of sample papers during the year. They are actually quite similar to what you will face in the exam, both in style of question and difficulty.

              Now I'm going to be really anally retentive about this, but it is the registration exam, not the pre-reg exam

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              • #8
                Originally posted by johnep View Post
                Reference Guide For The Pharmacy College Admission Test (For PCAT Preparation)
                Author Manan H Shroff
                Edition First edition 2005-2006


                Description 700 questions with answers and complete explanations. It includes:

                1. 200 questions on general biology, microbiology, and human anatomy and physiology.

                2. 200 problems on algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, pre-calculus, trigonometry and calculus.

                3. 200 questions on inorganic and elementary organic chemistry.

                4. 45 questions on general, non-scientific word knowledge, analogies and sentence completion.

                5. 40 practice questions for Reading Comprehension.


                NOTE: Study more in Science and Math. They give more bearing in this area.

                This is example of the PCAT exam in the USA.
                johnep
                I don't think those question will be much use for the registration exam to be honest.
                You need to be able to do your calculations quickly. You need an understanding of OTC probably to the depth you'll get in the "responding to symptoms book". Read your MEP and understand exactly what it is saying. And a fair knowledge of contents of the BNF but more importantly you should know what is in the BNF, where to find it and how to interpret it. The exam will not test your rote learnt knowledge of the BNF. A lot of people make this mistake and get bogged down trying to learn what is on paragraph 3 of page 252. Don't do it. You'll walk through the open book paper if you know how to use the BNF.

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                • #9
                  Oh well, if you know your MEP. What is the answer to the following;

                  Private script for Dalmane 2x30 caps 15mg, rept x 3, Dated 19.12.2006.

                  I started to dispense and cptr (lloyds) flashed up could not be repeated as CD.

                  This made me very nervous re validity if over 28 days.

                  Is script OK to dispense over month old?

                  Is it true re repts not allowed?

                  Phoning NPA today to check.

                  johnep

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=ferretmanabu;4315]And a fair knowledge of contents of the BNF but more importantly you should know what is in the BNF, where to find it and how to interpret it.

                    Dear Ferretmanabu,
                    Could you give us some examples please to learn from.
                    Thanks.

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                    • #11
                      here's a quick example: use of corticosteroids in pregnancy. If you look in the appendix it doesn't tell you too much & directs you the section in chapter six. The section on corticosteroids in chapter six has a bit about use in pregnancy. The key point is 88% of prednisolone is inactivated by the placenta, while betamethasone and dexamethasone cross the placenta readily.

                      The key here is not so much knowing the information, its knowing where to find it. To get through the open book exam you need to know the layout of the BNF back to front. So, you should know that management of asthma is at the start of chapter 3, NSAIDs are chapter 10, penicillins are at the start of chapter 5, H.pylori eradication is midway through chapter 1, digoxin is at the start of chapter 2 and that oral contraceptives are in chapter 7. Use the BNF as much as you can between now and the exam and learn where things are in it. Some people tab their BNFs (I tabbed each chapter, each section in each chapter and the appendices. I even tabbed the index from A to Z), which I would suggest doing, but do it in a way you can use effectively.

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                      • #12
                        Dear Steve G,
                        Thank you very very much for the very useful information.
                        (Are we allowed to use our own BNF in the exam or do they provide it please?)

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                        • #13
                          reply

                          I passed the pre-reg exam this year (at my 1st attempt)

                          Here's my advice

                          1. Study the reference sources intensively (especially the BNF) e.g. a BNF chapter every two weeks. Aim to have studied the references sources five times over.

                          2. Get the Further MCQ's in Pharmacy Practice book (Pharmpress) and also the "pass the pre-reg exam" book (Elsevier) both very good with useful info on preparing for the exam tabing the BNF etc.
                          The Pharmpress book "The preregistration year a survival guide" has a useful chapter on calculations, the rest of the book is extremely patronising, get it out of the library and read the calcs chapter bypass the rest of the book it's horse-manure and has no relation to reality.

                          3. The main constraint in the real exam is time, u simply don't have very much, try to get Full length sample papers if you can. Co-op produced a good one this year. Lloyds and Boots wouldn't let anyone take their sample papers.

                          4. The real exam is a lot harder than the sample RPSGB papers. The sample papers are not indicative of the dificulty of the real exam. Gosh that newsletter they sent out was such a pile of BS!

                          5. Practice calculations everyday after work and don't be ashamed to re-learn the basics e.g. long division, multiplication etc.

                          6. Don't listen to the liars who say things like "I didn't study at all" - BS "Everyone passes the prereg exam" - no they don't, 84% passed this year that's pretty appalling for people with a masters degree.
                          Anyone ever bother to care about the poor souls who after five years of study and three attempts will never be Pharmacists - Cos the RPSGB is such a caring Bunch.

                          7. When you are finished doing your evidence or are tired & depressed because a Jade Goody-technician is making your life hell - DO SOME STUDY -It's the best antidote.

                          Good luck

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by openmind View Post
                            Study the reference sources intensively (especially the BNF) e.g. a BNF chapter every two weeks. Aim to have studied the references sources five times over.
                            Beside the BNF and probably MEP, what reference sources do you have to study?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hannahd View Post
                              Beside the BNF and probably MEP, what reference sources do you have to study?
                              The Drug Tarif, get familiar with the vaious sections of it. The NPA produce a useful cd on it.

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