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  • PhD in Pharmacy and Pharmacy as a career

    Hi all,

    I've been doing some thinking lately. I know it's a bit too early for me to think about doing a PhD in Pharamcy, and I also know that doing a PhD in this specialised subject is usually funded but you get very little pay (£15-17k?) compared to a newly qualified pharmacist. The main issue that bothers me is that, after doing a PhD, does it mean :

    1) It would be quicker for you to be promoted to a higher position, e.g. consultant/management level and your wage would eventually 'catch up' to those who did MPharm and started of as a pharmacist?

    2) Nothing like the above, other than letting you to achieve a personal goal and if you discovered something during your PhD research, you could become rich by commercialising your 'product'.

    3) Something else?

    I would appreciate any opinions and thoughts that you may wish to share, no matter whether you've completed a PhD or not, I just hope someone could end my misery and make me happy again! me=

    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by Robusty
    Hi all,

    I've been doing some thinking lately. I know it's a bit too early for me to think about doing a PhD in Pharamcy, and I also know that doing a PhD in this specialised subject is usually funded but you get very little pay (£15-17k?) compared to a newly qualified pharmacist. The main issue that bothers me is that, after doing a PhD, does it mean :

    1) It would be quicker for you to be promoted to a higher position, e.g. consultant/management level and your wage would eventually 'catch up' to those who did MPharm and started of as a pharmacist?

    2) Nothing like the above, other than letting you to achieve a personal goal and if you discovered something during your PhD research, you could become rich by commercialising your 'product'.

    3) Something else?

    I would appreciate any opinions and thoughts that you may wish to share, no matter whether you've completed a PhD or not, I just hope someone could end my misery and make me happy again! me=

    Thanks
    Hi and welcome

    I worked in a lab with 7 people who had a PhD. This was years ago, but all said something similiar to what you write in 2.

    If you want to work in the pharmaceutical industry, then a PhD would benefit you a lot.
    Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
    Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
    Thank you for contributing to this site.

    Comment


    • #3
      15-17K is a bit optimistic unless you do a pharmaceutics or pharmacy practice PhD (these usually have more industry funding). My better half only gets 12K for his (synthetic chemistry) and that's pretty normal funding.

      Option (1) : PhD offers no advantage over non-PhD people if you're thinking of going into community/hospital. But you'll still get paid just about the same as them so you're not really at much of a disadvantage either.

      Option (2) is the most likely.

      Options (3) : You will be master of your own time for three more years. Note though that it is a lot of work - most people I know do about 40-50 hours a week. But the time you do this work is up to you - get in when you want, leave when you want, take 3 hour boozy lunch breaks (not that's something you can't get away with in Boots...).

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by admin
        Hi and welcome

        I worked in a lab with 7 people who had a PhD. This was years ago, but all said something similiar to what you write in 2.

        If you want to work in the pharmaceutical industry, then a PhD would benefit you a lot.
        hm...so its not that great to have a PhD in Pharmacy then if i want to work as a community pharmacy...?

        when you said it fould benefit me a lot to work in the pharmaceutical industry, what do you mean? in terms of knowledge? or easier for you to get to things......

        thanks

        Comment


        • #5
          A PhD is definitely not a "must" for community Phcists. What you do need is;
          -a spare pair of legs, for when the first set get tired;
          -a thick skin;
          -VERY broad shoulders;
          -a good sense of humour;
          -8 pairs of hands;
          -your own pair of good scissors;
          -lots of holidays!
          Ze genuine Article, present & perfect!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Robusty
            hm...so its not that great to have a PhD in Pharmacy then if i want to work as a community pharmacy...?

            when you said it fould benefit me a lot to work in the pharmaceutical industry, what do you mean? in terms of knowledge? or easier for you to get to things......

            thanks
            I mean you will find a job much easier to get, as you would already have research experience. You will probably (but not always) get to a higher position then someone without one.

            If you want to work in retail, it would be a waste of 3 years of your life, unless it's something you really want to do.
            Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
            Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
            Thank you for contributing to this site.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Zoggite
              A PhD is definitely not a "must" for community Phcists. What you do need is;
              -a spare pair of legs, for when the first set get tired;
              -a thick skin;
              -VERY broad shoulders;
              -a good sense of humour;
              -8 pairs of hands;
              -your own pair of good scissors;
              -lots of holidays!
              lol, why the thick skin, the very broad shoulders and 8 pairs of hands? (and my own pair of good scissors?????)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by admin
                I mean you will find a job much easier to get, as you would already have research experience. You will probably (but not always) get to a higher position then someone without one.

                If you want to work in retail, it would be a waste of 3 years of your life, unless it's something you really want to do.
                I will find a job much easier to get? Like a higher employment chance ( in the industrial and hospital sector?)

                I understand why it would be a waste of 3 years if i want to work in the retail, it would be a bit 'overqualified', wouldn't it?? BUT its definetely an advantage(or a must?) to have a PhD if I want to work in a hospital or go into Industry, am I right to say that??

                Thanks

                (Other than that, my other minor reason of thinking to do a PhD is that it would be like achieving something 'high and special' in my opinion...since I'd like to become a doctor (as in a GP or hospital doctor) but i dont like getting stuck in a small room like a GP nor do I like seeing blood and hear ppl in pain everyday ... so doing a PhD in Pharmacy is like a substitude to be a doctor to me in one sense as i think they are both challenging....and not easy... perhaps i like the title 'Dr'...lol

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Robusty
                  i dont like getting stuck in a small room like a GP nor do I like seeing blood and hear ppl in pain everyday ...
                  In that case, here's a subtle hint:Don't go for retail Pharmacy!
                  Ze genuine Article, present & perfect!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Zoggite
                    In that case, here's a subtle hint:Don't go for retail Pharmacy!
                    Well, at least a retail pharmacist doesn't get locked inside a room with the patient and they can walk around and chat with other ppl or staff (assistance dispenser etc) and surely a retail pharmacist doesn't always have to see any disturbing sights..? why did you say that anyway??
                    Last edited by Robusty; 3, September 2006, 02:28 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oh yes you do!
                      More and more pharmacies are being fitted with consultation rooms, which are quite handy if someone wants to talk to you in confidence, or discuss the morning-after pill for instance; but if dirty old Mr Jones wants you to have a look at his jock itch, it's very tricky to weedle out of it!
                      We're now expected to perform blood glucose tests, cholesterol tests, anticoaggulant clinics, and in Scotland they even got some phcists to give flu-jabs (see PJ 29 july 2006)...
                      As for not hearing people in pain every day...Have you ever worked in a community pharmacy, Robusty?
                      If you'd really like to become a doctor, then why settle for "second best"? It's 40 years of working life you're deciding upon, here!
                      Last edited by Zoggite; 3, September 2006, 03:09 PM.
                      Ze genuine Article, present & perfect!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Robusty
                        I will find a job much easier to get? Like a higher employment chance ( in the industrial and hospital sector?)

                        I understand why it would be a waste of 3 years if i want to work in the retail, it would be a bit 'overqualified', wouldn't it?? BUT its definetely an advantage(or a must?) to have a PhD if I want to work in a hospital or go into Industry, am I right to say that??

                        Thanks

                        (Other than that, my other minor reason of thinking to do a PhD is that it would be like achieving something 'high and special' in my opinion...since I'd like to become a doctor (as in a GP or hospital doctor) but i dont like getting stuck in a small room like a GP nor do I like seeing blood and hear ppl in pain everyday ... so doing a PhD in Pharmacy is like a substitude to be a doctor to me in one sense as i think they are both challenging....and not easy... perhaps i like the title 'Dr'...lol
                        I'd say a PhD would not help you in a hospital. It's a research qualification, and is fine for industry, but no help in a hospital. Also, I don't know if you know this, but in a hospital you wouldn't be allowed to use the title "Dr" as it only confuses the public. Only medics can use that title in a hospital. So the only "benefit" is you could have it on your check book!

                        When it comes to being "squeamish" you very quickly become used to that kind of thing. If you really want to be a Dr, do not let that put you off. You still see plenty of things as a pharmacist if you work in hospital, so if that is a major problem for you, then a hospital is not the place for you. You might be giving someone advice one day about their medication, and the next day they are dead.

                        I once went into a room to talk to a guy, to see how he ws getting on with the changes in pain medication I had advised the SHO to do the day before. His friend said "will you look behind "Fred's" curtain, because we always have breakfast together and he hasn't got up yet today - I think he's still asleep". So I took a peep inside the curtain. He was asleep alright - he was dead!

                        I then went to another ward, and told the sister what had just happened. She said "don't you see many dead bodies?". I told her we didn't, working in the pharmacy, so she led me to a room where there was a woman who had died about an hour previous! I saw two dead bodies within one hour!

                        Doing a PhD is not a substitute for being a medic. One is a research qualification, the other is a medical one. If you think thet being a Dr of pharmacy would give you equal standing in a hospital to a medic, then you are wrong - it won't. If you don't like "small spaces" then retail won't be any good for you either, so that leaves industry, where jobs can be hard to find.

                        Good luck with whatever you decide to do !

                        Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
                        Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
                        Thank you for contributing to this site.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          oic, thanks admin

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Zoggite
                            Oh yes you do!
                            More and more pharmacies are being fitted with consultation rooms, which are quite handy if someone wants to talk to you in confidence, or discuss the morning-after pill for instance; but if dirty old Mr Jones wants you to have a look at his jock itch, it's very tricky to weedle out of it!
                            We're now expected to perform blood glucose tests, cholesterol tests, anticoaggulant clinics, and in Scotland they even got some phcists to give flu-jabs (see PJ 29 july 2006)...
                            As for not hearing people in pain every day...Have you ever worked in a community pharmacy, Robusty?
                            If you'd really like to become a doctor, then why settle for "second best"? It's 40 years of working life you're deciding upon, here!
                            why pharmacists are 'second best'??

                            and i wont change my course either since i'm starting this 29th...and i wont even think of it..its giving me shivers.....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Pharmacist or Dr

                              Hi Robusty,
                              i am a community pharmacist and have been for 10 years and have decided to leave to become a Dr. I will be starting my studies this year. The two subjects are entirely different and bear no resemblance to each other. Pharmacy was not so bad a few years a go but as time has gone on working in community pharmacy at least has become really demoralising for a lot of pharmacists. The workload has increased, dissatisfaction amongst pharmacists has increased and a record number of pharmacists are wanting to change their profession as was observed in the PJ research. If you are thinking that by becoming a pharmacist it will make it easier for you to become a Dr then that is wrong. You will have to give up 5 years of training first then join the ranks of pharmacy with very little options other than retail or community unless you do your PhD and go into industry where i suspect that you will deal very little with patients. PhD are for research and not much use in community. That is testified by the fact nowadays it doesn't matter how good a pharmacist you are the pay is still the same. Don't waste your time training for one profession or taking on further studies in order to progress to another. Jump into medicine straight away instead. Trust me the advice you have already received from the other posts has hit the nail on the head. Listen to them and take note. All the best.

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