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  • Moving to the USA

    Hi was wondering does any one know about being a pharmacist in the USA? Do you have take exams so you are able to work out there?

  • #2
    Originally posted by miss_spicey65
    Hi was wondering does any one know about being a pharmacist in the USA? Do you have take exams so you are able to work out there?
    I once looked into it and it depended which state you were going to work in. I think I wrote to the USA version of the Pharm Soc and they sent me some stuff.
    Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
    Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
    Thank you for contributing to this site.

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    • #3
      Maybe this can help:
      http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/540204

      Comment


      • #4
        Working in US

        I read a really good article in April's edition of 'Hospital Pharmacist' regarding obtaining a US pharmacist licence. It seems like quite a lengthy process; much more complex than working elsewhere in the EU or in Australia / New Zealand as there is no reciprocity agreement.

        The article is freely available at:

        http://www.pharmj.com/pdf/hp/200604/...04_careers.pdf

        Hope this helps!

        Comment


        • #5
          Pharmacy in the USA

          Come over.... because we need you. The pharmacists shortage in the USA is so acute that the average starting wage for a 40 hour week is $100,000.00 a year. This is your wage right out of the box. The 25 year old makes the same wage as the 65 year old. Most "chains" pay a sign-on bonus of $20,000.00 or more just to take a job with them. Most will provide an automobile. They pay the lease payments as long as you continue to work for them. Plus all of the benefits. Not all of them "fringe".
          This situation exists because of the BABY BOOMERS. There are so many of them and they are going to stretch us to the limit. They want to be healthy, vibrant and sexy right on through. Better living through chemistry.
          It seems that Canadians, Indians, Pakistanis, Egyptians, Persians and others have figured this out.
          Google NABP (National Association of Boards of Pharmacy) in Chicago to check out the foreign equivalency process. It is not that daunting.

          For a good peak at pharmacy in America, click here www.jimplagakis.com
          Then click MESSAGE BOARD.
          Jim Plagakis

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jpgakis
            Come over.... because we need you. The pharmacists shortage in the USA is so acute that the average starting wage for a 40 hour week is $100,000.00 a year. This is your wage right out of the box. The 25 year old makes the same wage as the 65 year old. Most "chains" pay a sign-on bonus of $20,000.00 or more just to take a job with them. Most will provide an automobile. They pay the lease payments as long as you continue to work for them. Plus all of the benefits. Not all of them "fringe".
            This situation exists because of the BABY BOOMERS. There are so many of them and they are going to stretch us to the limit. They want to be healthy, vibrant and sexy right on through. Better living through chemistry.
            It seems that Canadians, Indians, Pakistanis, Egyptians, Persians and others have figured this out.
            Google NABP (National Association of Boards of Pharmacy) in Chicago to check out the foreign equivalency process. It is not that daunting.

            For a good peak at pharmacy in America, click here www.jimplagakis.com
            Then click MESSAGE BOARD.
            Jim Plagakis
            Jim

            Is this true? Where do I sign!

            What is the job like over there?

            Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
            Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
            Thank you for contributing to this site.

            Comment


            • #7
              By 'eck, Admin, just imagine if you landed a job in a Las Vegas pharmacy (or "drugstore", as I believe they're known as); You'd never be out of the casinos!
              Ze genuine Article, present & perfect!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Zoggite
                By 'eck, Admin, just imagine if you landed a job in a Las Vegas pharmacy (or "drugstore", as I believe they're known as); You'd never be out of the casinos!
                Yeah, that could eat my salary up quite a bit......or make me rich..............
                Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
                Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
                Thank you for contributing to this site.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Absolutely True!!

                  I am not kidding one bit. The pharmacist shortage here will go on for at least 3 or 4 more decades. I work 27 hours a week. Enough for a man my age. No matter that I still have a Master's chops. Enough is enough. Three days a week and I will gross over $64,000.00 in 2006. I know a young woman near Seattle, an Egyptian from Alexandria. Heba works a 40 hour full time job. Plus, she works a part time gig. If she is still doing that, she will come close to $145,000.00 in 2006. Heba, I think, is a bit compulsive. She does have a very nice house in Mukilteo looking down on the Puget Sound. Heba also takes great vacations three times a year. She is a single woman.
                  Take a look at what USA pharmacists feel and think. It may sound familiar.

                  www.jimplagakis.com

                  Jim

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jpgakis
                    I am not kidding one bit. The pharmacist shortage here will go on for at least 3 or 4 more decades. I work 27 hours a week. Enough for a man my age. No matter that I still have a Master's chops. Enough is enough. Three days a week and I will gross over $64,000.00 in 2006. I know a young woman near Seattle, an Egyptian from Alexandria. Heba works a 40 hour full time job. Plus, she works a part time gig. If she is still doing that, she will come close to $145,000.00 in 2006. Heba, I think, is a bit compulsive. She does have a very nice house in Mukilteo looking down on the Puget Sound. Heba also takes great vacations three times a year. She is a single woman.
                    Take a look at what USA pharmacists feel and think. It may sound familiar.

                    www.jimplagakis.com

                    Jim
                    Jim

                    Do you have to do extra training or exams to go to the USA ? I looked into it a few years ago, and it depended which state you wanted to work in. Also, my husbands a builder - could he get a job there?
                    Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
                    Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
                    Thank you for contributing to this site.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Come on over!!

                      I am writing to you from the US.. just outside of Boston. I am a follower of the www.jimplagakis.com website on this side of the pond and came to this forum to see what's going on over here. Jim is right about the ongoing shortage of pharmacists, and the high salaries. Depending on the exact area you're going to work in, the sign-on bonus and the car lease may differ, in some areas they're not being offered at all (i.e. Downtown Boston). From what I've heard from the foreigners that I've come across is that you have to have to take the Foreign Graduate Equivalency Exam to sort of guage what level of knowledge you have and whether it's up to par with the American requirements (this is for Massuchusetts by the way..can't speak for other states because I don't know). I also know that you also have to work 1500 hours as training or internship (they usually pay you the graduate pharmacist rate, which is usually half the licensed pharmacist rate..not too bad!). I think it would be worth it, and I would certainly welcome a foreign grad who can actually speak English!! I know CVS (largest chain pharmacy in the US) has an immigration law firm that handles all the work visas for the foreign grads. CVS pays all the fees (at least they used to) so you don't even need to worry about that (between $6000 and $8000 of legal & immigration fees).
                      Good Luck.. maybe I'll see some of you when you cross the pond!!
                      "Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake" Napoleon Bonaparte

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the info Joe.

                        The thing that concerns me with working in the USA is the crime figures. Guns are virtually non existant here, yet seem to be a part of everyday life in the USA.

                        Do you have any problems with crime in the pharmacy?

                        Do the customers/other health professionals respect your knowledge etc?
                        Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
                        Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
                        Thank you for contributing to this site.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm not sure if you heard about it, but a few years ago there were a lot of robberies in the general Boston area, all related to Oxycontin (slow-release oxycodone.. I know that often drugs have different names in different countries, not sure about this one). The CVS pharmacy that I used to manage at the time was robbed twice, once with a knife being flashed. Thank God I wasn't there either time. These guys just wanted the drugs, they weren't looking for money, so we gave them what they wanted and they left. It still happens every once in a while now, but not like before.. there was some organized gang doing all those robberies back then, and they either got caught or just simply left the area. Generally speaking, the Boston area is pretty safe.. though there certainly are several neighborhoods that I would never set foot in.. you just have to use your common sense.. I mean, you wouldn't be planning to go on holiday to Bagdad any time soon, would you?? Same thing with staying out of the neighborhoods that you often hear about on the news, that's all. Having said that, nothing is 100% safe, you can't go about worrying about stuff like that all the time, it'll drive you crazy.

                          One thing you need to consider if you're considering a move to the US, but not sure where, is cost of living, which varies quite a bit! The Boston area is one of the most expensive places in the country as far as real estate and general cost of living. Still, I would never move from here. We have some of the best hospitals and colleges in the whole world at our fingertips. Lot of history in Boston too (thanks to you guys ). Nice beaches (water is always a bit chilly though). Mountains and skiing not too far away. Lot of quaint little New England towns to visit. We're about 3 1/2 hours drive from New York and about 5 1/2 hours drive from Montreal, both are great cities with a lot to offer. For me, another reason why I would not be leaving is because I went out on my own last year and opened a new pharmacy from scratch, so I'm still in the "establishing the business" phase. It hasn't been easy, but much better than working for the damn chains! No supervisor to report to.. no getting ready for a visit from one of the V.P.'s from corporate. I had a separate compounding room built so we can offer that as a specialty, and I love that because that's where the money is these days (80-90% profit margins!). I'm in a town 20 miles outside Boston where the biggest crime here is speeding on the main road.. these people here have nothing else to do. One time I was reading the police log, and someone had actually called them to report a turtle on the road!!

                          I definitely get a lot more respect now that I'm on my own, from everyone really: colleagues, other health professionals, and definitely more from customers. You see, they know that when you're working for a chain, they can take advantage of you and just call the regional supervisor if you won't give them what they want. Here, it's just me! Colleagues give me more respect for having left the chain and opening up on my own (smack in between 2 chain pharmacies! ) Health professionals give more respect for several reasons: First, we answer the phones directly, no computerized answering system here. Second, we specialize in compounding, so we have more to offer. Third, we also offer the biggest selection of orthobedic braces and medical supplies and help people choose the right one, something that will never happen at any chain because no one has time there.

                          I think that's enough for now. I'll write again another time. Hope this helps.
                          "Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake" Napoleon Bonaparte

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One more thing..

                            Admin, you mentioned your husband is a builder and you were concerned about him finding work here. Once he establishes himself independently, he will make a ton more than you ever will around the Boston area! Anyone with a trade here is like that: Plumbers, Electricians, even Landscapers for God's sake! I have yet to meet a plumber who will show up to the house without billing at least $150, even for the smallest 10-minute job.. these SOB's have the nerve to bill for travel time in between jobs even!! I've already told my wife that our son will be either a plumber or electrician when he grows up, whether he likes it or not!!

                            I guess what I'm trying to say is that you don't need to be worried. While you have to jump through hoops and take exams to get a license to practice, he can just start working, and within a year or two he can probably go on his own, even if he has to start with small remodeling jobs (more money actually).
                            "Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake" Napoleon Bonaparte

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