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Staffing Levels - learning from failure

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  • Staffing Levels - learning from failure

    Its all about jargon and learning from failure and making changes that make things simpler - read Matthew Syed - Black Box Thinking.

    What amazes me is just now bad the medical profession is at making things difficult for folks - example going for a blood test - do hospitals have "Blood Test Clinics" or Cancer Depts. We use PMRs - what does the R stand for and exactly how does the PMR "manage the pharmacy" - its a "DC" dispensing computer, and why Rx, and why BD for twice a day, and, and

    As a result of all this medical hocus-pocus pharmacies are lumbered with dispensing difficult to pronounce meds like amylod and amitrip etc and mistakes occur.

    Some years ago the govt introduced the Plain Language initiatives which have made most govt forms far easier - I recently purchased some land, the Land Registry doc I had to fill in has its name in the top right corner - its a TR1 - Title Registration 1 - if you want to know how to fill it in just google TR1.

    Its time the medical profession tried to simplify our lives.

    A couple of suggestions:

    Every drug in the BNF has been approved by NICE. NICE should insist that the manufacturer tells NICE the EAN ( barcode number) - then item checking can become much easier.

    Every drug gets a simple acronym - perhaps based on its main usage, so all blood pressure drugs get BP so atenolol might be BP23-25. This would be printed in LARGE type on the packet with the full name also printed in the normal size. PMRs would also print the acronym on the label. Then everybody in the work string from the doctor, pharmacist, carer, patient and A&E would have a simple way to pass information.

    I invite folks to come up with a list of things that could be done to reduce errors. This list can then be sent to the BBC ( who are obviously preparing a Panorama special ) then let their journos ask GPHC for answers.

    Pete


  • #2
    When I started my apprenticeship, all doses were in latin BD means Bis in de etc. We put nothing on the label other than "The Mixture" , "The Tablets" . It was all part of the mystique.
    I was told that Pil Panis gold coated and ADT (Any damned thing)) were popular before the war.
    johnep

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pedro848 View Post
      Its all about jargon and learning from failure and making changes that make things simpler - read Matthew Syed - Black Box Thinking.

      What amazes me is just now bad the medical profession is at making things difficult for folks - example going for a blood test - do hospitals have "Blood Test Clinics" or Cancer Depts. We use PMRs - what does the R stand for and exactly how does the PMR "manage the pharmacy" - its a "DC" dispensing computer, and why Rx, and why BD for twice a day, and, and

      As a result of all this medical hocus-pocus pharmacies are lumbered with dispensing difficult to pronounce meds like amylod and amitrip etc and mistakes occur.

      Some years ago the govt introduced the Plain Language initiatives which have made most govt forms far easier - I recently purchased some land, the Land Registry doc I had to fill in has its name in the top right corner - its a TR1 - Title Registration 1 - if you want to know how to fill it in just google TR1.

      Its time the medical profession tried to simplify our lives.

      A couple of suggestions:

      Every drug in the BNF has been approved by NICE. NICE should insist that the manufacturer tells NICE the EAN ( barcode number) - then item checking can become much easier.

      Every drug gets a simple acronym - perhaps based on its main usage, so all blood pressure drugs get BP so atenolol might be BP23-25. This would be printed in LARGE type on the packet with the full name also printed in the normal size. PMRs would also print the acronym on the label. Then everybody in the work string from the doctor, pharmacist, carer, patient and A&E would have a simple way to pass information.

      I invite folks to come up with a list of things that could be done to reduce errors. This list can then be sent to the BBC ( who are obviously preparing a Panorama special ) then let their journos ask GPHC for answers.

      Pete
      Some of the coding is coming with the introduction of the matrix codes on the packaging as part of FMD.
      Inside these codes are GTIN, Batch number and Expiry date. FMD makes use of the product serial number.
      Could be that a patient smartphone app could read the codes as well?

      Product naming is another thing.
      Problem with naming after its use... some products have multiple uses - which one should you start with?
      What happens if someone comes in and says I'm on BP23-twenty something?

      How about having another form of name on them showing how they are pronounced...
      allopurinol 100mg Tablets
      Al-oh-PURE-i-noll

      Latin doses - agree should be passed into history. They are confusing for newcomers and the public. 1qd is not the same as 1qid/1qds so they are very dangerous.
      Prescribed instructions such as 1 3 times a day are also just as bad.
      Work has been going on for sometime for a standard dosage syntax. I think it is stalled at the moment.
      https://psnc.org.uk/contract-it/phar...eroperability/


      Medical Terminology
      There are hundreds of synonyms and different ways of saying almost the same thing.
      Plus diseased are named after what they were first thought of as being caused by.
      Malaria anyone?
      Ringworm?
      They also have latin names for illnesses - but these are remarkably portable in all world languages.

      47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
      2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
      How times change.

      If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

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