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  • Disclosing that you have ADHD to your employer.

    I was recently diagnosed ADHD- PI (Predominantly Inattentive), prescribed Elvanse. Not long after, I started work as a trainee dispenser (zero previous pharmacy experience) and I'm really, really struggling at it. I thought the training would've been slow, methodical and gradual, but in reality I've just been chucked in at the deep end and it's all 'learn as you go'.

    The biggest problem though is that this job seems to place high demands on the areas where an ADHD person is at a cognitive deficit - working memory, organisation, mental processing speed, information recall, detail orientation, multi tasking, switching between tasks - these are all areas that I really struggle with, especially in such a fast paced environment, and consequently I'm making too many mistakes. I've never been the fastest worker, but ironically I was prized for my accuracy in my last job (I was more thorough than anyone else), but this approach required a luxury called 'time' which I am simply not afforded in this job. I fear that I may just be fundamentally ill-suited to this line of work.

    I'm wondering if it would be best all round to disclose my diagnosis to the pharmacist? My confidence is at rock bottom, I can tell my colleagues aren't exactly thrilled with me now that the 'new guy' honeymoon period is over. What I'd like to know are the thoughts of Pharmacists on this forum as to how you would react to this information from one of your dispensers? Is this individual just a liability who needs shown the door? Are you glad for the disclosure and want to help this person to perform better at their job? Are you indifferent, it doesn't change anything? Please be honest. I would appreciate any advice on this.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by PropranoLOL View Post
    I was recently diagnosed ADHD- PI (Predominantly Inattentive), prescribed Elvanse. Not long after, I started work as a trainee dispenser (zero previous pharmacy experience) and I'm really, really struggling at it. I thought the training would've been slow, methodical and gradual, but in reality I've just been chucked in at the deep end and it's all 'learn as you go'.

    The biggest problem though is that this job seems to place high demands on the areas where an ADHD person is at a cognitive deficit - working memory, organisation, mental processing speed, information recall, detail orientation, multi tasking, switching between tasks - these are all areas that I really struggle with, especially in such a fast paced environment, and consequently I'm making too many mistakes. I've never been the fastest worker, but ironically I was prized for my accuracy in my last job (I was more thorough than anyone else), but this approach required a luxury called 'time' which I am simply not afforded in this job. I fear that I may just be fundamentally ill-suited to this line of work.

    I'm wondering if it would be best all round to disclose my diagnosis to the pharmacist? My confidence is at rock bottom, I can tell my colleagues aren't exactly thrilled with me now that the 'new guy' honeymoon period is over. What I'd like to know are the thoughts of Pharmacists on this forum as to how you would react to this information from one of your dispensers? Is this individual just a liability who needs shown the door? Are you glad for the disclosure and want to help this person to perform better at their job? Are you indifferent, it doesn't change anything? Please be honest. I would appreciate any advice on this.

    Thanks.
    Patient safety comes first and if you are slow at first then get the hang of things great but if you forget constantly and are unable to successfully complete tasks then I would performance manage you with next steps and deadlines if you fail then you are a liability and a risk regrdless of your condition which I appreciate is genuine but risky for my patients and reputation. Sorry to tell you but withholding the info will only work against you.

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    • #3
      You need to read The Equality Act 2010. Try this website http://www.stammeringlaw.org.uk/ it's about the impact of the equality act on stammering, well written and applies more generally widely.

      You have a long term condition (lasting more than 12 months or likely to last more than 12 months), that has a 'substantial' impact on day to day life that is 'non-minor or trivial' that leads to a 'substantial disadvantage' through a procedure, criterion or practice. ETC. You need to tell the employer to have that protection. It's called a knowledge defence. Write a letter to HR head office.

      I do understand not wanting to tell them, you're probably worried (rightly) about being pigeonholed by (possibly) bullying colleagues or just ones that are well meaning but clueless.

      Quite aside from that, how long have you worked there? If you have worked there a couple of months that's very different to if you have worked there 2 years.

      Remember also that the pharmacists have a professional responsibility to train you https://www.pharmacyregulation.org/s...a_sep_2011.pdf

      When you say chucked in the deep end this also suggests to me that you work in a very bad workplace, or have a bad manager. This is further reinforced by the 'learn as you go' which could also have other interpretations. So there isn't enough info to say but I see several possibilities
      • You aren't suited to it (maybe, but seems a bit early to say that)
      • You have a bad manager (here I'm using the definition one who won't train you properly)
      • You work in a bad workplace
      • You work in a very busy workplace short on staff (that isn't so much your manager or other staff's fault).
      • You have very high expectations of learning quickly (too quickly) and for whatever reason
      • You're very self critical
      On balance of the limited info you've given, it seems much more likely to me that the middle options in there are more likely to be true.

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      • #4
        I think you have an obligation to tell your manager/employer. I appreciate you may be keen to work there but patient safety is top priority. Have a chat to your Boss and see what help can be given to enable you to develop at a rate which will keep everyone happy (possibly shadowing a more experienced member of staff). Having said all that, if you are unable to deliver in some basics (remembering where stock is etc) these can impact on the rest of the team. Always remember, there is no shame in saying "This is not for me"

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        • #5
          So did you disclose?

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