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Reference books in dispensary...???

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  • Reference books in dispensary...???

    Which reference books do people use or are given by their employer in their dispensary? I will assume the BNF!


    The reason I am asking is in most branches of the multiple I work for there is a copy of Stockleys. I think this book an amazing source of information and rely on it alot. The store I am at now there isnt a copy and on requesting one from our head office I was told only pre-reg branches get a copy and that I had to use the F7 function on the dispensing system we use.

    Now, this F7 function is as much use as the choccy fireguard we always hear about. It uses stars to tell you the severity of the interaction and basically what happens and thats it - no info on if its a clinically significant interaction or how to manage it.

    I have found my self on the phone to a doctor recently informing him on an unfamiliar interaction and having to tell him that I didnt know if it was significant or not and the only thing I could tell him was to change it to one that didnt make my computer beep at me and make me see stars. (not actually the words I used) made me feel like a right numty.


    Thankfully due to a friend at a local hospital I have managed to get my hands on an old copy (1996)

    Anyone else have the same problem???

  • #2
    Re: Reference books in dispensary...???

    Might be worth getting the pocket version (around £20 off Amazon).
    (Amazon.co.uk: Stockley's Drug Interactions: Pocket Companion 2008: Karen Baxter: Books)
    Otherwise it's around £130! Do you know anyone with Athens subscription to Medicines Complete? You can access latest version of Stockley plus many other useful resources online at Enabling Cookies: MedicinesComplete if you can get hold of a password. Subscription is very expensive though.

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    • #3
      Re: Reference books in dispensary...???

      do we realy need to pay attention for interactions if it was not major? i have started training in a pharmacy 10 days ago and i was told unless te color changes into red, u do not have to pay attention about minor interactions, if it turns red the pharmacist will sort it with the prescriber.

      any advises ppl? plus am i going to use stockley book next year when i start pre-rig? i did not see any locums around here using it at all in real life situations.

      what do u think guys?
      [COLOR=Olive]xxxx They tried to break my back, but i survived. whatever doesn't kill you, will only makes you stronger xxxx
      [/COLOR]

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      • #4
        Re: Reference books in dispensary...???

        The Stockley book is well worth the weight in your briefcase if you are a locum.
        Put it the purchase through your accounts. Haven't got the pocket version though.

        I've heard that Cegedim's "Pharmacy Manager" software uses Stockley interactions through a licensing arrangement.
        47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
        2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
        How times change.

        If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

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        • #5
          Re: Reference books in dispensary...???

          Stockley's is an absolutley fabulous book. If I did not have one in my branch, or I was doing relief/locum work I would get a copy of the pocket guide at the very least. Compared to Stockley, the BNF appendix on interactions is completely useless.

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          • #6
            Re: Reference books in dispensary...???

            Originally posted by Ray View Post
            do we realy need to pay attention for interactions if it was not major? i have started training in a pharmacy 10 days ago and i was told unless te color changes into red, u do not have to pay attention about minor interactions, if it turns red the pharmacist will sort it with the prescriber.

            any advises ppl? plus am i going to use stockley book next year when i start pre-rig? i did not see any locums around here using it at all in real life situations.

            what do u think guys?
            The usefulness of pmr interaction alerts depends on the underlying data. I use eclipse which has green/yellow/red interactions, and doesn't help a lot. For example, two antihypertensives = yellow, aspirin + warfarin = yellow, methotrexate + NSAID = yellow. The only red ones I can remember off the top of my head are combinations of drugs that prolong QT interval.

            I use Stockley on a daily basis as it gives a wealth of information which can be used to make a decision about any interaction.

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            • #7
              Re: Reference books in dispensary...???

              if may i ask, do you really have time to check the interactions or only important ones like warfarin, lithium, ACEIs...etc? i mean does the dispensing staff member ask you whenever interaction box pops up? or only when green ones does?
              how do you deal with that, do you council the patient about the risk of interaction and i.e miss a dose if u suffered from hypotension or hypokalemia...etc?

              plz enlighten me, i am still a student and been intoduced to ECLIPSE 2 weeks ago.
              cheers
              [COLOR=Olive]xxxx They tried to break my back, but i survived. whatever doesn't kill you, will only makes you stronger xxxx
              [/COLOR]

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              • #8
                Re: Reference books in dispensary...???

                I try to label as much as possible so that I can see the patient's history and so that I can make a decision about any interactions that pop up. I'm also training my staff - they know not to bother me with 'increased hypotensive effect' interactions, but they tell me about anything involving warfarin for example.

                How you deal with an interaction depends on what the interaction is. Sometimes you need to contact the doctor and get the prescription changed. Other times you can counsel the patient, or check that they are having a blood test in the near future.

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                • #9
                  Re: Reference books in dispensary...???

                  "The only red ones I can remember off the top of my head are combinations of drugs that prolong QT interval. "

                  today i have seen a red box methadone patient being prescribed olanzapine" not sure about the name", but it had another note; dispensing is authorised by - - pharmacist, so i did dispense it. tho i have to look it up on saterday in stockley to understand the reasons behind this hazardous interaction.
                  [COLOR=Olive]xxxx They tried to break my back, but i survived. whatever doesn't kill you, will only makes you stronger xxxx
                  [/COLOR]

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