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EU Referendum Impact on Pharmacy

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  • Probably true Merlyn, I will check and see if Leo and Nordisk have changed over. Ah well, the pig industry has lost a nice little earner. After extracting Heparin, rest went for pet food. Probably same for Insulin.
    We used to extract Chlorophyll from grass. The spent grass then went for animal feed as still contained protein.
    johnep

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    • It looks like pharmacists registered under the mutual recognition of EU qualifications will be allowed to continue their registration in the UK even if there is a no deal crash out of EU on 29 March. The Pharmaceutical Journal January 2019 reports that "The Department of Health and Social Care has put before parliament amendments to legislation that will allow the qualifications of EU pharmacists to be recognised". In the event of no deal it appears that as long as the EU pharmacists or technicians have applied to join the GPhC register before 29 March exit date they will still be recognised.

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      • Well, here’s one in the eye that ‘the turkeys voting for Christmas’ gobshites didn’t expect.

        ALL Nissan temporary staff have either been given permanent contracts, or have had their temporary contract extended. Let’s see how The Guardian spins that, assuming that they actually report it - and so far the snivelling toads haven’t.

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        • Originally posted by Gordon Mackenzie View Post
          It looks like pharmacists registered under the mutual recognition of EU qualifications will be allowed to continue their registration in the UK even if there is a no deal crash out of EU on 29 March. The Pharmaceutical Journal January 2019 reports that "The Department of Health and Social Care has put before parliament amendments to legislation that will allow the qualifications of EU pharmacists to be recognised". In the event of no deal it appears that as long as the EU pharmacists or technicians have applied to join the GPhC register before 29 March exit date they will still be recognised.
          That was agreed months ago.

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          • Originally posted by Gordon Mackenzie View Post
            Scotland should have no problem rejoining the EU. Northern Ireland also would get back in the EU by joining the Republic of Ireland. The risk is for England which might never get back in the EU as Spain is likely to veto over Gibraltar. It is by far safer if the government withdraws Article 50 before it expires on 29 March or there is a people's vote with the option to stay in the EU for which the government would need to request an extension of Article 50 from the EU.
            Hahaha. Gordon you crease me up. Scotland will be a basket case after independence. You can’t run a country on whisky and oil. And please remember that you wont have a bank of last resort or even your own currency once you leave. The EU wouldn’t touch you with a barge pole regardless of what they are telling krankie.

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            • Scotland with more resources than Norway would be one of the richest countries in the world. Scotland has been assured by the EU that we are welcome to join the EU with the minimum of delay. Scotland would probably be better with its own currency but could keep the pound as it doesn't belong only to England.

              It looks as though Nissan will not now be creating 741 jobs in Sunderland as they move their new models to Japan because of Brexit:

              https://www.express.co.uk/news/polit...an-x-trail-suv

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              • Brexit is, however, creating a jobs bonanza in Europe as UK companies rush out the door to secure their place inside the EU:


                https://www.dutchnews.nl/news/2019/0...e-netherlands/

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                • Diesel sales have plunged so perhaps a blessing in disguise. Workers taken on will not now be laid off after a year or so.
                  johnep

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                  • Two of the models were to have been petrol vehicles. The Japanese have just signed a free trade agreement with the EU which is now in force making a free trade area of 620 million people with one third of the world's trade. They are not going to sit behind WTO tariff barriers of 10% into and out of the UK when they can export tariff free from Japan. In the criminally procured Brexit Referendum, illegal overspending by leave campaign amongst other factors, the vote was to leave the EU not abandon ALL our overseas trade deals. The Japanese have just told the UK that they will not roll over the EU-Japan free trade deal to include the UK after Brexit because they think they can get a better deal from the UK with only 66.2 million people than they could get from the EU with 520 million people. They are also looking to get a good deal out of the UK when negotiations come up for UK membership of the trans'Pacific partnership. Perhaps they sense the UK's weakness and desperation for any kind of deal.

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                    • The Japanese just wanted to sell into Europe. Certainly when I tried to sell Chlorophyll into Japan, I met nothing but obstacles and the apparent desire to protect their own small operation who extracted Chlorophyll from silk worm faeces. It seems you have to be an ex enemy and friend of the Nazi occupation rather than those who stood up for freedom alone until America entered the war. As James May said, you must first lose a war to be successful. The UK government thought they would be exporting cars to Europe not the reverse. I never once saw a European car when I was in Japan.
                      johnep

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                      • Project Fear very rapidly becoming Project Reality. That's Honda closing it's Swindon plant with the loss of 3500 jobs with the multiplier being five times that in dependent jobs outside the Swindon factory. Let's hope the breakup of the Labour party due to Brexit will result in Article 50 being withdrawn and an enquiry into criminality during the Brexit Referendum being carried out. There are only 39 days left to save the economy.

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                        • Originally posted by Gordon Mackenzie View Post
                          Project Fear very rapidly becoming Project Reality. That's Honda closing it's Swindon plant with the loss of 3500 jobs with the multiplier being five times that in dependent jobs outside the Swindon factory. Let's hope the breakup of the Labour party due to Brexit will result in Article 50 being withdrawn and an enquiry into criminality during the Brexit Referendum being carried out. There are only 39 days left to save the economy.
                          Honda have been removing work and jobs from that plant since 2013. Lack of diesel sales have affected them and the Civic is a dog of a car. Under the new EU Japan trade deal there is no advantage to having a plant in the UK. However it is interesting that they are leaving their HQ in the UK rather than elsewhere in the EU. Nor do they they intend moving production to the EU. Consolidating production in Japan will reduce their overall costs especially as they have now passed legislation to allow more foreign labour in Japan, thus gaining a source of cheaper labour. I think Brexit is a side issue here.

                          Given your fondness for the EU, what is your explanation for the EU signing a trade deal with Japan that could lead to the loss of all Japanese car manufacture in the EU?

                          The entire car industry is in a state of flux at the moment. Diesel cars are well on the way out, petrol cars are going the same way. The new demand is for hybrid/electric cars. Alongside that you also have an increase in the numbers of self driving cars and changes in legislation to permit their use. This in itself is probably the biggest shakeup in transport since horses were replaced by the internal combustion engine. That change took less than twenty years to be complete. Twenty years from now most people won’t have personal cars, they will simply dial up a car to take them where they want to be, and which will return when requested. No need for cars to spend 95% of their time at rest in a car park, they will be in virtually continuous use.

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                          • Originally posted by sparkybw View Post

                            Honda have been removing work and jobs from that plant since 2013. Lack of diesel sales have affected them and the Civic is a dog of a car. Under the new EU Japan trade deal there is no advantage to having a plant in the UK. However it is interesting that they are leaving their HQ in the UK rather than elsewhere in the EU. Nor do they they intend moving production to the EU. Consolidating production in Japan will reduce their overall costs especially as they have now passed legislation to allow more foreign labour in Japan, thus gaining a source of cheaper labour. I think Brexit is a side issue here.

                            Given your fondness for the EU, what is your explanation for the EU signing a trade deal with Japan that could lead to the loss of all Japanese car manufacture in the EU?

                            The entire car industry is in a state of flux at the moment. Diesel cars are well on the way out, petrol cars are going the same way. The new demand is for hybrid/electric cars. Alongside that you also have an increase in the numbers of self driving cars and changes in legislation to permit their use. This in itself is probably the biggest shakeup in transport since horses were replaced by the internal combustion engine. That change took less than twenty years to be complete. Twenty years from now most people won’t have personal cars, they will simply dial up a car to take them where they want to be, and which will return when requested. No need for cars to spend 95% of their time at rest in a car park, they will be in virtually continuous use.



                            Roll on the day! trouble is, I probably either won't be driving by then or won't live to see it at all.

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                            • Again illustrates the folly of selling off our own industry and taking the begging bowl for inward investment which vanishes when problems happen. I was a victim of that policy myself when the Swiss company I was working for grabbed the export markets for itself.
                              johnep

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                              • It's not just Honda though:

                                Honda no more
                                Flybmi no more
                                Nissan no more
                                Panasonic no more
                                Sony no more
                                Dyson no more
                                Ford no more
                                Phillips no more
                                Hitachi no more
                                Jaguar Land Rover no more

                                #Brexit

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