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  • Switching forms

    Hi all, just wanting to check something. Legally speaking if a medication is prescribed say as a capsule but is only made in tablet form, does the script need to changed by the doctor or is it just accepted that tablets are issued?

  • #2
    Dentists used to order tablets of Amoxil when only capsules were available. we simply gave capsules and explained to pt. Endorsed script.
    johnep]

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    • #3
      Well that's what I thought. It's one of those situations I was doubting myself because yesterday I had shall we say a very heated discussion with another dispenser regarding this matter and the pharmacist didn't intervene to clarify who was correct which I was surprised about and as she is very young I did wonder if she wasn't sure herself.

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      • #4
        The dentists had usually come from abroad where Amoxil Tabs routine. Because some products are difficult to granulate, they are marketed as capsules at first. Later tablet formulations could be made. However, if capsules well established then manufacturers don't bother to launch tablets.
        johnep

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        • #5
          Thank you so much.

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          • #6
            I think strictly legally speaking you should at least contact the prescriber to clarify and then endorse the prescription with "PC".

            In the real world I would say any pharmacist will just change the form unless there is confusion, as, for example, if the prescription say "Zomorph tablets", did they mean zomorph capsules or did they mean another form of morphine in tablets? In that case I wouldn't give out, but something like an antibiotic (as jonhep mentioned used to happen often with amoxicillin) is quite obvious what they mean and will cause no harm to the patient.

            You were both right I would say hahah

            Sara

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            • #7
              On a busy Bank Holiday, four deep at the counter and others queuing. Contact a prescriber over Amoxil, not likely! However if a CD, then your hands are tied and prescriber or correctly written script necessary.
              johnep

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              • #8
                Even on a normal quiet day I wouldn't contact the prescriber over that. But I think strictly legally speaking it may be a requirement

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