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Are customers becoming aggressive and demanding now?

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  • Are customers becoming aggressive and demanding now?

    I was shocked to hear yesterday from a patient who turned up as we were closing up shop after opening hours expectung us to reopen and dispense his rx because he is going away in the morning!

    he did not ask politely he demanded I do his rx as if it was his right to hold us i signed out as rp and I had an important place to go to after work so refused and said go to the nearest late opening pharmacy or take it with you on holiday. He wasted alot of our time and energy with his rudeness to be honest they now expect us to destroy our life commitment for their laziness he was too lazy to bring it earlier and claimed the other Pharmacist ie the manager often stays open 2 hours after advertised closing time!!

    are rps allowed to stay open after closing hours will their employer liability insurance cover errors occuring after official opening times? I am sure they would wash their hands off any liability.

    what do you guys think?

  • #2
    Balance this with what the need of the patient is. Is it for an urgent medicine that he could be harmed by if he does not need it there and then (i.e. say, having an asthma attack and needing salbutamol or is it simply a box of senna tablets)?

    NHS contract is quite specific on what contracted hours are expected to work though and as long as you have done them then the NHS can't really have an issue with unfulfilling your contract.

    There may, however, be a professional issue if the script was a real emergency.

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    • #3
      You will be surprised what the pts/customers call an emergency. One youth caught us as we were leaving and said, Must have a pkt of Durex as meeting his girl friend. We have had addicts coming in with their script as we were closing and saying had been in the pub and forgot the time.
      johnep

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      • #4
        Originally posted by johnep View Post
        You will be surprised what the pts/customers call an emergency. One youth caught us as we were leaving and said, Must have a pkt of Durex as meeting his girl friend. We have had addicts coming in with their script as we were closing and saying had been in the pub and forgot the time.
        johnep
        ofcourse we should help in an emergency but lazy people are taking advantage of our kindness and expecting us always to re-open for them because they were watching tv or in the pub, it is insulting how unimportant our time is for them they would never do that at the doctors or dentist they arrive so early yet with us we are at the bottom of their list an after thought and as we are their slaves we stay open like mugs unpaid.

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        • #5
          Hardly worth turning them down these days as a complaint will go into 'head office'.
          Automatically guilty.
          Also no smoke without fire, so you must have done this on many other occasions that haven't yet been reported.
          So you were guilty of those as well.
          47 BC : Julius Cesar : Veni Vidi Vici : I came, I saw I conquered.
          2018 AD : Modern Man : I shopped, I clicked, I collected.
          How times change.

          If you find you have read something that has upset or offended you an anyway please unread it at once.

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          • #6
            Patients were always demanding.

            It's Nov/Dec and it's a very pressured time of year so it's going with the territory.

            However on a serious note talking all times of year, yes I do believe that patients are becoming more aggressive and certainly more demanding.

            I do encounter quite a lot of passive aggressive behaviours more and more often.

            Comment


            • willerz86
              willerz86 commented
              Editing a comment
              I fire the abuse right back at them and I feel great. No complaints about me yet...

            • mcitr
              mcitr commented
              Editing a comment
              The problem with passive aggressive behaviour is that isn't always possible. I had one a while ago where the patient was being obstructive and I'd been as helpful as possible, so I let the pharmacist talk to them, same answer, then on the way out they suddenly made a comment to the pharmacist and dropped a derogatory term in the rest of the sentence as if to make it sound like a more reasonable 'complaint'. The pharmacist fair enough said 'come on now, no need for that', but they'd already wandered off and pretended not to hear.

          • #7
            MCITR - being passive aggressive is no good, it’s much better to be assertive from the start. If you take that much crap (passive) that you eventually lose your temper (aggressive) you’ll come across bad.
            Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
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            Thank you for contributing to this site.

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            • mcitr
              mcitr commented
              Editing a comment
              There's no point us being passive aggressive.

              I've not said the insult that the patient levelled at me otherwise someone might work out where I work, but the pharmacist wasn't that chuffed and that was their instant reaction.

              In the situation I described I told the person straight away what they were asking and they chose to not believe me. It put them in an awkward position so they had to concoct an elaborate narrative of asking me other questions, little digs, questioning the pharmacist and then the barb that'd get them kicked out of some pharmacies at the end. Passive aggressive, as they didn't even want to say it to me, they had to say it to someone else and do it on the way out.

          • #8
            This particular customer was aware he brought his non urgent rx late as he admitted the man pharmacist (gender specified) always does it for me! This was a convenience demand not a polite urgent need. One had to say no to him to stop him taking advantage of us mugs.

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            • #9
              The comment about passive aggressive behaviour was a very general one.

              Take the flu forms for example, you get a few people moaning or refusing to fill them in or then feigning not understanding something. The over the counter cough/cold/flu stuff we can sell this time of year is good as for some people that may save worry and a trip to the doctor, however that's not without it's trials. The regular patients lying and saying nicely no, no, no I don't have asthma or any blood pressure or heart medication at all when they've just given in a script to you with loads of things on, then a moment later the passive aggression comes, why do you ask? Then the I want to know how this works why are you asking. Then when the pharmacist is called they don't want to talk to the pharmacist. You get one or two of them a day.

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              • #10
                Bi witnessed an aggressive man he came in asking for night nurse piriton and nytol all for his wife when the CA asked let me check with tge pharmacist he shouted at her and demanded just sell it to me in a loud aggressive tone of voice she said cqlmly dont talk to me like this be civilised he barged out of the shop mumbling something under his breath lol he then came in next day sweet as pie..her assertiveness worked as he was very cooperative the next day with me. Don't let them get away with it you are not going to be sacked for refusing their aggressive demands and poiting out how they can be incorrect sometimes. I tell them the truth now the best policy.

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                • #11
                  Had people come to the door a few times just as I was locking the door. Always said - sorry I have already set the alarm and it is on a time lock.
                  I always suggested a localish longer hours pharmacy.
                  I never looked at the prescription in question.
                  On the very odd occasion a GP would phone and say I am sending a patient with an urgent script and I know you are about to close. Then a couple of minutes late would be acceptable because you knew it was urgent. The GP never abused this so was willing.
                  As has been said no doc or dentist would reopen etc.
                  I never engaged in discussion as it almost inevitably leads to anger and is never productive imho

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                  • #12
                    I am always quite stern with such patients. The key is being stern but not aggressive. I once had to a put a nurse in her place after she kept telling the CA "It's okay I am a nurse, I know what I am doing" instead of answering the questions. We pharmacists do need to be stern, mostly in a "I am hard on you because I care " type although sometimes we just need to put some people in their place and remind them they're in a pharmacy and who's in charge!

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                    • #13
                      Anyone rude and demanding would get short shrift from me, and certainly would not get their prescription dispensed.

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                      • #14
                        We closed for lunch (supposedly). Just as the morning girl went out the door, she let a couple in and said the pharmacist would be pleased to dispense your script while you wait. It was a typical shipping order and I finally closed the door 40 minutes later. I was going to open at 2.15 pm but in came the afternoon girl just before two and said Oh no, we have to open. I did get 20 minutes for lunch so meant to be grateful.
                        johnep

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                        • #15
                          Originally posted by Racer2 View Post
                          Anyone rude and demanding would get short shrift from me, and certainly would not get their prescription dispensed.
                          We work in retail and aren't business owners.

                          The complaints SOP is the most important out of all the SOPs.

                          We had a complaint a while back where a new patient complained about two members of staff because they couldn't get what they wanted - a batch, immediately, basically. Pharmacist had to spend 10 minutes talking to member of the public in the consultation room and just say nice things to them and apologise even though no action was taken whatsoever - no comment whatsoever by the pharmacist. Member of the public of course had the last say and on the way back came back to the counter and yelled harumph I shall go to another pharmacy. To the corporate suits it's 'lost business' even though this person who was rather demanding and aggressive tried our pharmacy, got our business and we couldn't give them what they wanted as it was impossible.

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