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  • paracetamol syrup

    hi, guys yesterday morning , saturday of course when the surgery in town are closed, I received a prescription for paracetamol suspension with no indication for the total quantity, obviously the mum was desperate to get it and she didn't want to pay having a prescription. So what is the correct behaviour? would you not dispense? or which size would you dispense?thanks

  • #2
    Re: paracetamol syrup

    Dispense whatever you want, staple a note to script " dear doctor please amend and initial as follows" and leave for shop assistant to take to doctor's receptionist on monday.

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    • #3
      Re: paracetamol syrup

      The BNF states that where a pharmacist receives an incomplete prescription and the prescriber cannot be contacted; then providing that the pharmacist has sufficient information to make a professional judgement the preparation may be dispensed.

      If the quantity is missing the pharmacist may supply sufficient to complete up to 5 days' treatment. The prescription must be endorsed ‘p.n.c.' (prescriber not contacted), the quantity, the dose, and the strength (where applicable) of the preparation supplied must be indicated, and the endorsement must be initialled and dated.

      This is of course the official line, and in practice and would deal with the prescription in the same way as Lamzee. Dispense, attach a note for the GP, and get it changed when the surgery re-opens.

      To not dispense in this situation, in my opinion, would be too extreme. As with all such situations you need to weigh up the risk-benefit balance. I personally feel that the benefits to the child outweigh the risks in this scenario.

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      • #4
        Re: paracetamol syrup

        thank you!

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        • #5
          Re: paracetamol syrup

          This has happened more times than can remember. Give 5 days or nearest pack.
          johnep

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          • #6
            Re: paracetamol syrup

            I would give one OP - usually 100ml for paracetamol bottles. Unless splitting from big bulk tubs and would give a reasonable amount.
            wake up and smell the 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione

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            • #7
              Re: paracetamol syrup

              Originally posted by pharmatron View Post
              The BNF states that where a pharmacist receives an incomplete prescription and the prescriber cannot be contacted; then providing that the pharmacist has sufficient information to make a professional judgement the preparation may be dispensed.

              If the quantity is missing the pharmacist may supply sufficient to complete up to 5 days' treatment. The prescription must be endorsed ‘p.n.c.' (prescriber not contacted), the quantity, the dose, and the strength (where applicable) of the preparation supplied must be indicated, and the endorsement must be initialled and dated.

              This is of course the official line, and in practice and would deal with the prescription in the same way as Lamzee. Dispense, attach a note for the GP, and get it changed when the surgery re-opens.

              To not dispense in this situation, in my opinion, would be too extreme. As with all such situations you need to weigh up the risk-benefit balance. I personally feel that the benefits to the child outweigh the risks in this scenario.


              The official line might be "legal" but that does not mean that the PPA will pay.
              They probably would still return it to be initialled by the GP.

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              • #8
                Re: paracetamol syrup

                Originally posted by lamzee View Post
                The official line might be "legal" but that does not mean that the PPA will pay.
                They probably would still return it to be initialled by the GP.
                The unofficial line might be to write in a reasonable quantity and initial it.

                Jeff

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