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  • Retail to Hospital opportunity

    I'm keen to move from the retail side of BOGOF shop rubbish to a more clinical position. I've had a few interactions with hospitals but no real experience. Can anyone advise me on the view hospitals take to using locums from the community environment with a view to getting a permanent position? I've spoken to a few people and it seems like it does tend to vary between hospitals as to whether or not they use locums. Cheers guys.

  • #2
    Originally posted by BimboRat
    I'm keen to move from the retail side of BOGOF shop rubbish to a more clinical position. I've had a few interactions with hospitals but no real experience. Can anyone advise me on the view hospitals take to using locums from the community environment with a view to getting a permanent position? I've spoken to a few people and it seems like it does tend to vary between hospitals as to whether or not they use locums. Cheers guys.
    Hi BimboRat and welcome to the forum

    I have worked in two hospitals and went from retail into those jobs. I have put a post on this forum about how I got my first hospital job. Here's a copy (of a copy I think) of the post.

    This is an old post that I keep putting up. I guess it could apply to a pre-reg interview, so hope it helps.

    I got a job, as a grade D pharmacist, after being only qualified for 4 months. This is what got me it, over another candidate who already had 3 years experience, and a clinical diploma. It was a small hospital with only two pharmacists. The job was to cover maternaty leave and then do a job share afterwards. Q is the questioner, A is what I said.

    Q. There are no other pharmacists in the hospital and all the doctors are on a course. The sister from ward 2 calls you and says she's worried about a patient on a drip.
    A. What's the problem?
    Q. They have developed a sudden high temperature.
    A. Since the drip was put up?
    Q. Yes within 15 minutes
    A. Whats in the drip?
    Q. Flucloxacillin
    A. I would advise them to stop the drip. The patient could be having a bad penicillin reaction. Stopping the drip for an hour or so, until the doctors get back, won't harm the patient, but if it is a bad reaction it could cause real harm, even death to the patient.
    Q. That's correct. Could you make decisions like this, on other matters?
    A. Yes if I felt I had enough information.
    Q. When can you start?

    The woman with the experience, and diploma answered: -
    A. I would find you
    Q. I am on holiday out of the country
    A. I would track you down
    Q. I am in the amazon jungle with no phone
    A. I would call another hospital

    The interviewer (later my boss) told me that even though she had much more experience then me, and a clinical diploma, she simply could not make a decision. As there were only two pharmacists at the hospital,the other pharmacist would often have to run the department alone, and be confident enough to make a decision. He said he felt I could, so I got the job.

    I don't know if this could help you, but basically be confident (not cocky) and try to show you can learn, and use what you have learned to advise others and make decisions.

    I also interviewed two people when in this job. I took both candidates onto my wards with me, and talked to them about possible problems we might find. The first was only interested in re-arranging the stock, supplying drugs etc. They didn't ask a single question, and could not answer any of mine.

    The 2nd listened to what I said, and asked questions about the drug therapy people were on. If he didn't know the answer to my question, he asked me where he could find it. I also took them both on a couple of ward rounds I used to attend. The first said nothing, not a word. The 2nd told the consultant about his final year project, and what he thought about the choice of drugs, asking questions and learning along the way. The team of consultant, SHO's and nurses listened to what he said and asked him questions, which he answered.

    I gave the job to the 2nd candidate. Get the idea?

    You do not have to be a walking BNF, but show you are keen. That's what impresses people.


    Hope this helps someone.
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