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  • Hospital Pre-reg interviews

    Hi

    Got a few pre-reg interviews commin up in the next few weeks! Any advice? Anyone had one recently in the last few years, what sort of things do they ask?

  • #2
    Originally posted by geordie1
    Hi

    Got a few pre-reg interviews commin up in the next few weeks! Any advice? Anyone had one recently in the last few years, what sort of things do they ask?
    This is an old post that I keep putting up. I guess it could apply to a pre-reg interview, so hope it helps.

    I got a job, as a grade D pharmacist, after being only qualified for 4 months. This is what got me it, over another candidate who already had 3 years experience, and a clinical diploma. It was a small hospital with only two pharmacists. The job was to cover maternaty leave and then do a job share afterwards. Q is the questioner, A is what I said.

    Q. There are no other pharmacists in the hospital and all the doctors are on a course. The sister from ward 2 calls you and says she's worried about a patient on a drip.
    A. What's the problem?
    Q. They have developed a sudden high temperature.
    A. Since the drip was put up?
    Q. Yes within 15 minutes
    A. Whats in the drip?
    Q. Flucloxacillin
    A. I would advise them to stop the drip. The patient could be having a bad penicillin reaction. Stopping the drip for an hour or so, until the doctors get back, won't harm the patient, but if it is a bad reaction it could cause real harm, even death to the patient.
    Q. That's correct. Could you make decisions like this, on other matters?
    A. Yes if I felt I had enough information.
    Q. When can you start?

    The woman with the experience, and diploma answered: -
    A. I would find you
    Q. I am on holiday out of the country
    A. I would track you down
    Q. I am in the amazon jungle with no phone
    A. I would call another hospital

    The interviewer (later my boss) told me that even though she had much more experience then me, and a clinical diploma, she simply could not make a decision. As there were only two pharmacists at the hospital,the other pharmacist would often have to run the department alone, and be confident enough to make a decision. He said he felt I could, so I got the job.

    I don't know if this could help you, but basically be confident (not cocky) and try to show you can learn, and use what you have learned to advise others and make decisions.

    I also interviewed two people when in this job. I took both candidates onto my wards with me, and talked to them about possible problems we might find. The first was only interested in re-arranging the stock, supplying drugs etc. They didn't ask a single question, and could not answer any of mine.

    The 2nd listened to what I said, and asked questions about the drug therapy people were on. If he didn't know the answer to my question, he asked me where he could find it. I also took them both on a couple of ward rounds I used to attend. The first said nothing, not a word. The 2nd told the consultant about his final year project, and what he thought about the choice of drugs, asking questions and learning along the way. The team of consultant, SHO's and nurses listened to what he said and asked him questions, which he answered.

    I gave the job to the 2nd candidate. Get the idea?

    You do not have to be a walking BNF, but show you are keen. That's what impresses people.
    Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
    Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
    Thank you for contributing to this site.

    Comment


    • #3
      Why hospital pharmacy?
      Why this hospital?
      Where do you see yourself in five years?
      What would your friends say about you?
      They might ask you to identify a negative point about yourself.
      What do you think a pre reg tutors role is?

      Comment


      • #4
        Oh yeah,

        They always ask about clinical governance, cpd etc.
        Make sure you know what the society does! (or at least what its supposed to do).

        Sometimes, you'll get asked a couple of easy clinical questions like on simple interactions involving hepatic enzymes and how one drug would affect the level of another.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ferretmanabu
          Why hospital pharmacy?
          Why this hospital?
          Where do you see yourself in five years?
          What would your friends say about you?
          They might ask you to identify a negative point about yourself.
          What do you think a pre reg tutors role is?
          Do not give honest answers if you want the job.

          1. My uni only wants me to do 6 months in community
          2. It's near my girl friend
          3. Nowhere near a hospital
          4. There are so many - as far as hospital pharmacy experience is concerned - I'd have great difficulty in avoiding eye contact with waiting patients I was too busy to deal with.
          5. To protect society from unsuitable pharmacists?

          30 odd years ago and I didn't get the job ;-)

          Jeff

          Comment


          • #6
            I dont know interactions without looking them up in a BNF.

            Do they allow you to look it up?

            Comment


            • #7
              Cant look them up but they'll be very simple ones.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jeff
                Do not give honest answers if you want the job.

                1. My uni only wants me to do 6 months in community
                2. It's near my girl friend
                3. Nowhere near a hospital
                4. There are so many - as far as hospital pharmacy experience is concerned - I'd have great difficulty in avoiding eye contact with waiting patients I was too busy to deal with.
                5. To protect society from unsuitable pharmacists?

                30 odd years ago and I didn't get the job ;-)

                Jeff
                With all these open plan pharmacies, I'd say point 4 was the other way round. It's a lot easier to avoid everyone in a hospital pharmacy, and you are not on show to the public like in retail. At least that the way it was in the two hospitals I've worked in.

                And point five is really "to get a free extra pair of hands, that I can dump all the paperwork onto. Also to possibly make my CV look a little better, and maybe get me a few brownie points with the company".
                Lively debate is encouraged but please respect the opinions and feelings of others.
                Please help keep the forum vibrant by spreading the work to friends and colleagues via word of mouth or social media.
                Thank you for contributing to this site.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Heya,
                  Have any of you got links to sites with info on medicines management and clinical governance? I've been doing a bit of googling but not quite finding what I want. Will be much appreciated ^_^

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Emmz
                    Heya,
                    Have any of you got links to sites with info on medicines management and clinical governance? I've been doing a bit of googling but not quite finding what I want. Will be much appreciated ^_^
                    All the info you need to recite like a sheep for medicines management is in the Spoonful of Sugar document. (here: http://www.audit-commission.gov.uk/r...-F80954A80F85). This document was from 2001, but basically summarises medicines management happening within UK hospitals. Like a lot of the best laid pharmacy plans, much of this document in reality didn't come into fruition. Don't say that in your interview though - many hospitals like to pretend they have an efficient meds management policy.

                    Clinical governance - for my interview I just learnt the definition somewhere along the lines of ''Clinical governance consists of a series of processes for improving quality and ensuring that professionals are accountable for their practice. These processes have been identified as continuing professional development, evidence-based practice, audit, dealing with poor performance, managing risk, monitoring clinical care and patient involvement.'' You'll find lots of wordy definitions for clinical governance but the basic principle is just ''be good, make sure your knowledge is up to date.'' It's that simple really.

                    Basically most hospital pre-reg interviewers are looking more for someone who's going to get on well with the rest of the department. So, just make sure you act nice and have a good basic knowledge of the above and your should be ok.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      hmm... i might just look at pharmacy practice scripts we cover quite a few interactions.

                      But if you dont know the answer will that mean you fail the interview? In my school of pharmacy students heavily rely on the BNF.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        good luck!!!

                        I have my interview tomorrow.

                        I hope it goes well, I really want to work in a hospital. If there is more than one interviewer i will probably mess it up by being too nervous. I cant help it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As far as I remember, the guidance for the registration exam regarding interactions was that hazardous interactions (black spotted- something like warfarin plus a macrolide) would be in the open book paper, and other interactions would be in the open book paper. So I'd guess that for a hospital pre-reg interview they might ask you about something like warfarin plus aspirin, but nothing too in depth. Remember, a large part of pharmacy is not what you know, but knowing where to find information. So its important to know that the BNF is reasonable for interactions, but Stockley is absolutley ace.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by N.T
                            All the info you need to recite like a sheep for medicines management is in the Spoonful of Sugar document. (here: http://www.audit-commission.gov.uk/r...-F80954A80F85). This document was from 2001, but basically summarises medicines management happening within UK hospitals. Like a lot of the best laid pharmacy plans, much of this document in reality didn't come into fruition. Don't say that in your interview though - many hospitals like to pretend they have an efficient meds management policy.

                            Clinical governance - for my interview I just learnt the definition somewhere along the lines of ''Clinical governance consists of a series of processes for improving quality and ensuring that professionals are accountable for their practice. These processes have been identified as continuing professional development, evidence-based practice, audit, dealing with poor performance, managing risk, monitoring clinical care and patient involvement.'' You'll find lots of wordy definitions for clinical governance but the basic principle is just ''be good, make sure your knowledge is up to date.'' It's that simple really.

                            Basically most hospital pre-reg interviewers are looking more for someone who's going to get on well with the rest of the department. So, just make sure you act nice and have a good basic knowledge of the above and your should be ok.
                            Thank you that's awesome ^_^ I'm hoping my interview will go ... I got good feedback from my appraisal when I did a placement there this summer.

                            Gaby, is it a West Mids hospital you got an interview for tomorrow? Unfortunately I think they're all panel interviews but don't worry!! Being interviewed by more than one person isn't too scary. Good luck!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The definition of clinical governance I've found easiest to remember is 'doing the right thing to the right patient at the right time'.

                              I wouldn't have wanted a panel interview, one to one was bad enough! Then again you might be lucky and have one of the nice T/Ps from Aston on the panel. Good luck anyway.

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