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  • Residency in pharmacy

    Hi everyone!
    Today I got one of the new band 6 pharmacists asking me if I knew the difference between a "normal" pharmacist job and a resident post. I actually don't know it myself and Im quite curious now.... Anyone who has a resident job or knows what it is like to be a resident pharmacist that could explain it to us. Thanks in advance

  • #2
    I would interpret as meaning you live on hospital premises and are on call.
    johnep

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    • sissy
      sissy commented
      Editing a comment
      living in the hospital premises and being on call every day? with a band 6 salary? that is horrible.
      In my idea it was that you will have to stay in site when on call but generally it would be similar to a normal pharmacist job, but I dont know

  • #3
    https://www.pharmaceutical-journal.c...irstPass=false

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    • #4
      Excellent article, I would be terrified!
      johnep

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      • #5
        Originally posted by sissy View Post
        Hi everyone!
        Today I got one of the new band 6 pharmacists asking me if I knew the difference between a "normal" pharmacist job and a resident post. I actually don't know it myself and Im quite curious now.... Anyone who has a resident job or knows what it is like to be a resident pharmacist that could explain it to us. Thanks in advance
        Hi,

        I'm starting a band 6 resident job next month and it's essentially just that when you're on call you remain at the hospital (resident on-call) rather than working and taking calls from home (non-resident on-call). Generally speaking you only find resident jobs at large, busy hospitals where you'll constantly be asked for advice / requests to supply medicines out of hours, so there's no point in a non-resident on-call because you'd have to come in so often to make these supplies. However you do have some massive Trusts like UCLH where they don't have a residency service; instead they have a non-resident on-call system.

        Hope this helps

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        • #6
          Thanks for the artcle hazeleyes, I think I came acorss it once. It's from 2010 in the meantime so much has changed, but the outlines of the service probably are still the same. Quite terrifying I have to agree with jonhep.

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          • #7
            Originally posted by Pharmadude View Post

            Hi,

            I'm starting a band 6 resident job next month and it's essentially just that when you're on call you remain at the hospital (resident on-call) rather than working and taking calls from home (non-resident on-call). Generally speaking you only find resident jobs at large, busy hospitals where you'll constantly be asked for advice / requests to supply medicines out of hours, so there's no point in a non-resident on-call because you'd have to come in so often to make these supplies. However you do have some massive Trusts like UCLH where they don't have a residency service; instead they have a non-resident on-call system.

            Hope this helps
            Thanks for posting Pharmadude. So basically you're not on-call every night you just spend the night there. I actually think is better that way, at least you're there already and it avoids having to travel in the middle of the night as I have to so many times. Let us know your thoughts when you start your new job. And good luck with it!

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            • #8
              Originally posted by sissy View Post

              Thanks for posting Pharmadude. So basically you're not on-call every night you just spend the night there. I actually think is better that way, at least you're there already and it avoids having to travel in the middle of the night as I have to so many times. Let us know your thoughts when you start your new job. And good luck with it!
              Hi,

              No probs! Yeah at the Trust I'm at it's a long day (9am - 8pm but you stay until your work is done so could be up to 10pm) about 1 in every 10 days and then a night shift (8pm - 9am) at about the same frequency. So the way it works is that 1 in every 10 days or so you do a long day and then you have about 24 hours off and come in at 8pm the next day for the night shift and then after the night shift you have that day off and you come in as normal (9am - 5.30pm) until your next long day (minus weekends, annual leave etc).

              And will do!

              Thanks!

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by Pharmadude View Post

                Hi,

                No probs! Yeah at the Trust I'm at it's a long day (9am - 8pm but you stay until your work is done so could be up to 10pm) about 1 in every 10 days and then a night shift (8pm - 9am) at about the same frequency. So the way it works is that 1 in every 10 days or so you do a long day and then you have about 24 hours off and come in at 8pm the next day for the night shift and then after the night shift you have that day off and you come in as normal (9am - 5.30pm) until your next long day (minus weekends, annual leave etc).

                And will do!

                Thanks!
                Thanks Pharmadude. Is not that horrible after all. Do you have to do entire weekends on call too or is always just one day?

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by sissy View Post

                  Thanks Pharmadude. Is not that horrible after all. Do you have to do entire weekends on call too or is always just one day?
                  Always just one day

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